MahMight haiku journal: Donna Fleischer joins the MahMight jet stream with guest Ōmine Akira

a jet

out of a cloud

white peony

Donna Fleischer

 

The MahMight submission requirements in addition to the obvious was to include something on the haiku submitted as well as the inclusion of one’s favorite haiku by someone else, and finally, one’s favorite quotes from Bertolt Brecht’s play,”Waiting for Godot” and Bruce Robinson’s British black comedy film, “Withnail and I”. This poet’s submission process was gloriously fun, owing to Alan Summers, poet, writer, author, editor, teacher, and publisher extraordinaire. The following is a favorite haiku by someone else —

 

On a night of insects

and in a sky of stars

the earth afloat

Ōmine Akira

Translated by Kōko Katō and David Burleigh

“This haiku is also the title of the new “The Earth Afloat Anthology of Contemporary Japanese Haiku” (Kadokawa Shoten, 2021), edited by Kōko Katō, and translated with commentary by Kōko Katō and David Burleigh. I favor it for being vast and timeless, momentary and small, and how it positions earth between time and space.” – Donna Fleischer

Alan Summers, MahMight’s editor and publisher further notes:

Ōmine Akira

author of The Genealogy of Sorrow: Japanese View of Life and Death

Translated by Taitetsu Unno

published in The Eastern Buddhist New Series 25 (2),14-29 (1992)

Translator Kōko Katō is also co-editor of A VAST SKY, Anthology of Contemporary World Haiku (2015) ed. Bruce Ross, Kōko Katō, Dietmar Tauchner, Patricia Prime.

You also get a bonus haiku from Donna if you click onto the link:

https://donnafleischer.wordpress.com/2015/05/01/a-vast-sky-an-anthology-of-contemporary-world-haiku-2015-paperback-bruce-ross-koko-kato-dietmar-tauchner-patricia-prime-editors/

Translator David Burleigh is author of In and Out of Japan: The Contours of Haiku

In response to Professor Shirane’s emphasis on literary allusion in Japanese haiku, David Burleigh notes the relative absence of allusion to Western literary or artistic history in haiku collections from the West, compared with several Japanese examples, with Paul Muldoon the notable exception.

see In and Out of Japan: The Contours of Haiku

Presented at the Haiku North America Conference, Ottawa, Canada, August 2009.

Parts 1 & 2

http://haikureality.theartofhaiku.com/archives/esejeng76.htm

http://haikureality.theartofhaiku.com/esejeng81.htm

The Earth Afloat: Anthology of Contemporary Japanese Haiku

Kôko Katô, Editor
Translated by Kôko Katô & David Burleigh

https://www.brooksbookshaiku.com/translations/earthafloat.html

Juxtaposition in haiku:

The Moon is Broken

https://area17.blogspot.com/2017/10/the-moon-is-broken-juxtaposition-in.html

 

Source: MahMight haiku journal: Donna Fleischer joins the MahMight jet stream with guest Ōmine Akira . . .

A Brunch Conversation with Janet Malcolm — March 19, 2013 – YouTube

SUNWORKER — smudge studio

Source: SUNWORKER — smudge studio

Janet Malcolm, Remembered by Writers | The New Yorker

The staff writer Janet Malcolm, who contributed to The New Yorker for nearly sixty years, has died.Photograph by Nina Subin

Notes on Malcolm’s legacy, from writers at and outside The New Yorker.

. . . Janet knew that seeing things the way they really are is, ultimately, impossible. One of her great themes is transference. This is the explicit subject of her first book, “Psychoanalysis: The Impossible Profession,” but it is also the basis for the dynamic she describes in “The Journalist and the Murderer.” Transference is what makes all relationships, including the writer’s relationship with her subject, so conflicted, and what makes “telling it like it is” so difficult. We carry our psychic baggage into every encounter. We can’t help it. We take sides. We cathect. – The New Yorker

Source: Janet Malcolm, Remembered by Writers | The New Yorker

Violeta Parra “Gracias a la vida” – YouTube

Stevie Wonder – Overjoyed (Unplugged) 1st take 1983 (Rare)

Nathaniel Mackey’s Epic Poem

Double Trio by Nathaniel Mackey (New Directions) (photo by Rodrigo Corral)

Memories appear and disappear in a meditative work that feels as if it could stop at any moment or continue on forever.

Source: Nathaniel Mackey’s Epic Poem

Matthew Wong’s Indelible Impressions

Matthew Wong, “Odyssey” (2017) ink on rice paper, 42 x 39 3/4 inches (©2021 Matthew Wong Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, Photography: Alex Yudzon / Cheim & Read, New York)

Just three years after he first devoted himself to art, Wong assembled an abstract vocabulary to create an entire world that is parallel to ours.

Source: Matthew Wong’s Indelible Impressions

A Pride Month Message From The Bidens – YouTube

Autumn Moon Haiku Journal – June 2021

honeysuckle breeze . . .
a barn swallow
in mid air

mountain ridge
coywolf’s breath
as it pauses

Donna Fleischer, USA

Source: Autumn Moon Haiku Journal – Home