Archive for August, 2012

The Body That Read the Laugh: Cixous, Kristeva, and Mothers Writing Mothers | Karina Quinn | M/C Journal

The Body That Read the Laugh: Cixous, Kristeva, and Mothers Writing Mothers | Karina Quinn | M/C Journal.

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Tomorrow (by Patti Smith)

Dedicated to the amazing poet, publisher, and editor Don Wentworth. With gratitude, DF

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My most favorite version of all others, anywhere, anytime, and found on YouTube thanks to Jon Eastman.  ~ yours truly

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Feeling, so much more complex than emotion, having depth. Nina Simone gets it. Her live performance at Montreux bears repeating again and again. ~ DF

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Shulamith Firestone, radical feminist, wrote best-seller, 67 | The Villager Newspaper


Shulamith Firestone
Shulamith Firestone, radical feminist, wrote best-seller, 67 | The Villager Newspaper.

Shulamith Firestone, another “woman on the edge of time” (Marge Piercy’s novel about Connie Ramos). Rest in peace, dear sister. ~ DF

A Carefully Crafted F**k You, Nathan Schneider interviews Judith Butler – Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics

A Carefully Crafted F**k You, Nathan Schneider interviews Judith Butler – Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics.

All I really have to say about life is that for it to be regarded as valuable, it has to first be regarded as grievable. A life that is in some sense socially dead or already “lost” cannot be grieved when it is actually destroyed. And I think we can see that entire populations are regarded as negligible life by warring powers, and so when they are destroyed, there is no great sense that a heinous act and egregious loss have taken place. My question is: how do we understand this nefarious distinction that gets set up between grievable and ungrievable lives?”~ Judith Butler

” Thinking can take place in and as embodied action. It is not necessarily a quiet or passive activity. Civil disobedience can be an act of thinking, of mindfully opposing police force, for instance. I continue to believe in demonstrations, but I think they have to be sustained.” ~ Judith Butler

I am not sure that the work is “inner” in the way that Gandhi described. But I do think that one has to remain vigilant in relation to one’s own aggression, to craft and direct it in ways that are effective. This work on the self, though, takes place through certain practices, and by noticing where one is, how angry one is, and even comporting oneself differently over time. I think this has to be a social practice, one that we undertake with others. That support and solidarity are crucial to maintaining it. Otherwise, we think we should become heroic individuals, and that takes us away from effective collective action.” ~ Judith Butler

So we might consider: what practices embody interdependency and equality in ways that might mitigate the practice of war waging? My wager is that there are many. . . .   am trying to bring together people to think about new forms of war and war waging, the place of media in the waging of war, and ways of thinking about violence that can take account of new forms of conflict that do not comply with conventional definitions of war. This will involve considering traditional definitions of war in political science and international law, but also new forms of conflict, theories of violence, and humanistic inquiries into why people wage war as they do. I’m also interested in linking this with studies of ecology, toxic soil, and damaged life.” ~ Judith Butler