Julia Kristeva and thought in revolt | Footnotes to Plato

Julia Kristeva
© Riccardo De Luca/Writer Pictures

To demonstrate the working of poetic language, Kristeva engages in a detailed study of nineteenth-century avant-garde poetry (notably that of Stéphane Mallarmé and the Comte de Lautréamont). The supreme irony, Kristeva argues, is that the most challenging (and to many, the most obscure) avant-garde writing (Joyce, for example) is indebted to childhood experience, an experience of universal scope.

Source: Julia Kristeva and thought in revolt | Footnotes to Plato

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