Beyond the Haiku Moment: Bashō, Buson, and Modern Haiku Myths – Juxtapositions  | The Haiku Foundation

ABSTRACT: Haiku has migrated from the country of its origin, and to languages and cultures that seemingly share nothing with Japan, yet the genre is thriving. The most energetic and thriving haiku culture resides in North America. Haruo Shirane, an authority on classical Japanese literature and a provocative writer on the legacy of haiku in the contemporary world, examines some of the changes which haiku has undergone in its travels, and evaluates them in relationship to the standard they might find in today’s Japan. Among the issues he considers are the place of metaphor and other poetic tools in haiku; the necessity of season words and seasonality in contemporary practice; the awareness and inclusion of “self” in English-language haiku; and the need for a “vertical axis” of reference and allusion to create depth. He also considers the broadly different approaches to senryū to be found between cultures.

Source: Beyond the Haiku Moment: Bashō, Buson, and Modern Haiku Myths

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