Posts Tagged ‘ art ’

Seeds of Change: A Botany of Colonization

Maria Thereza Alves’ project Seeds of Change is a fascinating and deliberate statement on the history of colonization being deeply embedded in the landscape of major cities around the world, including New York.

Source: Seeds of Change: A Botany of Colonization

Toni Morrison’s Final Thoughts at “Art and Social Justice” – Stella Adler Studio of Acting – YouTube

A Trailblazing Lesbian Artist Gets Her Due 

Harmony Hammond, “Kong” (1981), cloth, wood, foam rubber, acrylic, gesso, glitter, Dorland’s Wax Medium, charcoal powder, 41 x 74 x 26 inches, Everson Museum of Art, gift of Judith Daner

Made of foam rubber, gesso, glitter, wax and charcoal powder, these wrapped wooden armatures, which have a fantastical quality to them, were conjured up by a line in Monique Wittig’s 1973 novel Le Corps Lesbien (The Lesbian Body), in which she writes, “Cloth covered with latex suggests muscle and tissue.” These “wrapped sculptures” convey a muscular grace, as if Minimalism itself got a camp makeover par elegance.

Source: A Trailblazing Lesbian Artist Gets Her Due

Spotlighting Lesbian Artists as Central Players in California’s Queer History

The Lesbian Tide, May 1972 (image courtesy ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives at the USC Libraries)

Lesbian contributions to gay life and liberation have long been overshadowed, including in the art world.

Source: Spotlighting Lesbian Artists as Central Players in California’s Queer History

Sex, Art, and Misogyny | by Coco Fusco | The New York Review of Books

Slave Rape Series #13: Fight to Save Your Life by Faith RinggoldFaith Ringgold/ACA Galleries, New York/© 2019 Faith Ringgold/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, Courtesy ACA Galleries, New York

Faith Ringgold: Slave Rape Series #13: Fight to Save Your Life (detail), 1973

 

In 1974 the performance artist Marina Abramovic stood naked and immobile in a Naples gallery. Next to her was a table with seventy-two objects, including a loaded gun. Beside the objects was a document absolving the audience of responsibility for whatever they might choose to do to her with those objects. Freeing the audience from accountability turned the performance into an exposé of their ethics: they became actors in a scenario as well as witnesses of one another’s behavior. Some of them made violent gestures toward Abramovic—they were not exclusively sexual, but many were. She endured cuts to her skin as well as what one critic described as intimate caresses and minor sexual assaults before the audience erupted into a fight when a participant put the gun to her head. Interestingly, as soon as Abramovic ceased to be immobile and began to walk toward the people around her, they fled the gallery rather than reckoning with what they had done.

Source: Sex, Art, and Misogyny | by Coco Fusco | The New York Review of Books

Exist Otherwise: The Life and Works of Claude Cahun – Live! From City Lights

Source: Exist Otherwise: The Life and Works of Claude Cahun – Live! From City Lights

Empty storefronts of Hartford have been filled with dozens of artworks. No admission fee necessary. – Hartford Courant

 

 

 

 

Anyone wanting to know more about the art hanging at 74 Union Place can use a QR code in the window that takes them gallerist Ben-Kiki’s website. (Brad Horrigan/The Hartford Courant)

A row of vacant storefronts on Union Place in Hartford is the site of a new pop-up art gallery of work by artists who live, work or keep studios in the city.

The first round of artists in the “Inside Out Project: Hartford” are Matt Best, Chet Kempczynski, Michael Madore, Neil Daigle-Orians, Joe Bun Keo, Genevieve May, Bridget Kennedy, David Borawski, Hong Hong, Roxann Poppe Leibenhaut, Michael Rice, Paul Pham, Barbara Hocker, Ellis Echevarria, Jon Eastman and Balam Soto.

Source: Empty storefronts of Hartford have been filled with dozens of artworks. No admission fee necessary. – Hartford Courant