Posts Tagged ‘ book ’

Bright Leaf | Online Only | n+1

A habit. A comfort. An addiction. An indulgence. A nuisance. A crime. A vice. A sin. An error. A joy.Surprising cigarette-smoking locations:The dentist’s chair in Italy. . . .

Source: Bright Leaf | Online Only | n+1

Year of the Monkey by Patti Smith review – memories of the magic and the mundane | Books | The Guardian

‘Passive wanderings’ … Patti Smith. Photograph: Getty Images/Getty Images for Ray-Ban

From looming political crisis to a leaky flat – a troubled year in the life of a great American punk poet

Source: Year of the Monkey by Patti Smith review – memories of the magic and the mundane | Books | The Guardian

Monica White on Food Justice in the Past, Present, Future – Edge Effects

 

In Freedom Farmers, Monica White recovers histories of advancing Black freedom struggles with agriculture, from Du Bois to Fannie Lou Hamer to D-Town Farm.

Source: Monica White on Food Justice in the Past, Present, Future – Edge Effects

Machiko Kyo (1924 – 2019) | 3 Quarks Daily

Source: Machiko Kyo (1924 – 2019) | 3 Quarks Daily

Greta LaFleur Examines Environmental Histories of Desire – Edge Effects

Baba, Walton Ford, painting

A new book by Greta LaFleur shows how desire was produced alongside taxonomies of plants and racial difference in early British colonial texts.

Source: Greta LaFleur Examines Environmental Histories of Desire – Edge Effects

What We Owe a Rabbit | by Thomas Nagel | The New York Review of Books


Walton Ford/Kasmin Gallery

Walton Ford: Loss of the Lisbon Rhinoceros, 2008. For more on Ford’s work, see Lucy Jakub’s ‘Walton Ford: Twenty-First-Century Naturalist’ on the NYR Daily (nybooks.com/ford-daily).

Korsgaard sums up:

On a Kantian conception, what is special about human beings is not that we are the universe’s darlings, whose fate is absolutely more important than the fates of the other creatures who like us experience their own existence. It is exactly the opposite: What is special about us is the empathy that enables us to grasp that other creatures are important to themselves in just the way we are important to ourselves, and the reason that enables us to draw the conclusion that follows: that every animal must be regarded as an end in herself, whose fate matters, and matters absolutely, if anything matters at all.

Source: What We Owe a Rabbit | by Thomas Nagel | The New York Review of Books

A Love Note to the Quirky South

 

Roger Manley, “Howard Finster’s Paradise Garden, Summerville, Georgia” (1987–88) (© 2019 Roger Manley, photo courtesy Institute 193)

In this new, posthumously published book, he [Jonathan Williams] writes:

Walks to the Paradise Garden could have been called what Guy Mendes wanted for a title: Way Out People Way Out There. But, as a survivor from the Days of Highbrow Culture, I liked the deeper resonance of my choice. For one thing, many of the people in this book are directly involved with making paradise for themselves in the front yard, the back garden, the parlor, the sun porch, the basement. Making things for them has been a way to salvage a little dignity from often poor and difficult lives. Salvation can come, on one level, from being paid attention to and being recognized.

Decades in the making, the late poet Jonathan Williams’s photo-filled travelogue captures the creative spirit of a region.

Source: A Love Note to the Quirky South