Posts Tagged ‘ cherry blossoms ’

Incredible Scene As Deer Enjoy Blossoms In Japan’s Quiet Nara Park – UNILAD

kikiphotoworks/Instagram

Breathtaking images taken at Japan’s Nara Park show deer enjoying themselves beneath the peaceful cherry blossom trees.

Source: Incredible Scene As Deer Enjoy Blossoms In Japan’s Quiet Nara Park – UNILAD

A Relaxing Walk Through the Cherry Blossoms at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden

Source: A Relaxing Walk Through the Cherry Blossoms at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden

Haiku Invitational – Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival 2017

International

Falling cherry petals
how gently the world lets go
of light
                      Sanjuktaa Asopa
                     Belgaum, Karnataka

Haiku Winners announced! Honourable Mentions and Sakura Awards coming soon~

Source: Haiku Invitational – Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival

First Known When Lost: Basho

A cloud of cherry blossoms:
The bell, — is it Ueno?
Is it Asakusa?

Basho (1644-1694).  Ueno and Asakusa are adjacent districts in Tokyo. Ueno was (and is) well-known for its cherry blossoms.  Both districts have numerous temples (and, hence, bells).

*

I believe that R. H. Blyth’s 4-volume Haiku is still (more than 60 years after its publication) the best study of the cultural, historical, philosophical, and aesthetic background of the art form.  In his preface, Blyth provides this preliminary definition:

“Haiku record what Wordsworth calls those ‘spots of time,’ those moments which for some quite mysterious reason have a peculiar significance. There is a unique quality about the poet’s state of feeling on these occasions; it may be very deep, it may be rather shallow, but there is a ‘something’ about the external things, a ‘something’ about the inner mind which is unmistakable.  Where haiku poets excel all others is in recognizing this ‘something’ in the most unlikely places and at the most unexpected times.
. . . . . . . . . .
Haiku is a kind of satori, or enlightenment, in which ‘we see into the life of things.’  We grasp the inexpressible meaning of some quite ordinary thing or fact hitherto entirely overlooked.”

R. H. Blyth, Haiku, Volume 1: Eastern Culture (Hokuseido Press 1949), page 8.  A side-note: Blyth’s reference to Wordsworth reminds me that his knowledge of English poetry was as wide as his knowledge of haiku.  The four volumes of Haiku are interspersed with references to English poets and poems.  He also wrote an interesting book titled Zen in English Literature and Oriental Classics (1942).

Source: First Known When Lost: Basho

Hartford Courant – Wesleyan Photo Exhibit Depicts 2011 Nuclear Disaster In Japan

hc-fukushima-four-0220-jpg-20150219
WILLIAM JOHNSTON

Eiko in Fukushima, Tomioka
No. 1104, 22 July 2014.

Hartford Courant – Wesleyan Photo Exhibit Depicts 2011 Nuclear Disaster In Japan.

Yomiuri On-Line (読売新聞)

Yomiuri On-Line (読売新聞).

The cherry blossoms are blooming in Tomioka . . . ” ~ Deep Kyoto

Fukushima Renaissance by Taro Aizu

In Fukushima this child wears a dosimeter around his neck

 Fukushima Renaissance

TOM CLARK: Philip Whalen: April Showers Bring Rain?

 

 

TOM CLARK: Philip Whalen: April Showers Bring Rain?.

Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival 2010 Haiku Invitational Winners

 

Honorable Mentions

 

her last breath—
a cherry blossom falls
without notice
Rise Daniels
Tolland, Connecticut

 

 

tunnel of cherry blossoms
as I walk alone
to mail a letter
Tim Ashman
New Westminster, British Columbia

 

 

2010 Winning Haiku – VCBF.CA | VCBF.CA