Posts Tagged ‘ economics ’

How Can We Win by Kimberly Jones – YouTube

The following 7-minute YouTube video presentation from Kimberly Jones is extemporaneous. Her brilliant, eloquent truth-telling made me take a knee; my head and heart bow with gratitude, love, and humility for this concise, factual lesson from Kimberly Jones. Please take time to listen. – word pond
 

Coronavirus Economic Response Should Include Infrastructure – Bloomberg

There’s no time to lose.

Photographer: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

A strong recovery requires immediate relief to be coupled with long-term investment.

Source: Coronavirus Economic Response Should Include Infrastructure – Bloomberg

Elizabeth Warren Is Completely Serious – The New York Times

Pope Francis, in Sweeping Encyclical, Calls for Swift Action on Climate Change – The New York Times

Pope Francis was greeted by crowds at St. Peter’s Square this week. Credit

Filippo Monteforte/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Pope Francis, in Sweeping Encyclical, Calls for Swift Action on Climate Change – The New York Times.

About | Brock Blomberg’s Blog

About | Brock Blomberg’s Blog.

David Byrne – I Don’t Care about Contemporary Art Anymore?

An untitled work known as one of “The Megalopolises,” by Marcel Storr.

David Byrne – I Don’t Care about Contemporary Art Anymore?.

Hillary Clinton and the Democrats put a feminist spin on traditional liberal ideas.

Hillary Clinton understands that women’s issues go far beyond reproductive rights. Photo by Astrid Riecken/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton and the Democrats put a feminist spin on traditional liberal ideas..

Ten questions for Thomas Piketty, the economist who exposed capitalism’s fatal flaw – Quartz

 

Author Thomas Piketty   Reuters/Benoit Tessier

Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century went on sale in the U.S. this week, and its central message can seem like a prophecy of doom. It is that capital tends to accumulate faster than the economy grows in the long run; wealth thus concentrates in the hands of a few; and the egalitarian, upwardly mobile America of the mid-20th century was more a historical aberration than the natural order of things. Through their research into income inequality, Piketty and his colleague Emmanuel Saez provided the “1% vs the 99%” narrative that drove the Occupy Movement.

But what’s often missed, as Quartz’s Tim Fernholz found out when he talked to Piketty, is that the 42-year-old French economist is actually rather optimistic. To those who say that a global wealth tax, his proposed solution to inequality, is something that Americans would never accept, he retorts that nobody in 1910 thought the US would ever have income taxes, or more recently, that Swiss bank secrecy could ever be broken. A wealth tax, he suggests, could replace a tax on property, making it popular with middle-class homeowners and giving politicians a lever to push it through.

But whether Piketty’s optimism is misplaced, or even whether he is right, matters less than the fact that, by framing the problem in these clear terms, he has enabled a public debate. “Piketty has transformed our economic discourse; we’ll never talk about wealth and inequality the same way we used to,” wrote Paul Krugman, who knows a thing or two himself about changing economic discourse. Another legendary economist, Paul Samuelson, once said, “I don’t care who writes a nation’s laws, or crafts its treatises, if I can write its economics textbooks.” If Piketty’s work influences the terms in which politicians fight their battles, he too may end up having more influence than many of them.—Gideon Lichfield

Ten questions for Thomas Piketty, the economist who exposed capitalism’s fatal flaw – Quartz.

Nassim Nicholas Taleb — Beware those Black Swans / New Statesman

New Statesman – Beware those Black Swans.

Thought Control in Economics / AdBusters

Adbusters on Thought Control