Posts Tagged ‘ Euripides ’

The Anne Carson Interview | Quarterly Conversation

 

As I was interviewing the classicist, poet, and author Anne Carson in June, 2017 via e-mail about her new translation of The Bakkhai, the question-and-answer process felt like a consultation with the ancient Pythia. Much like an ancient Greek attempting to get an answer from the priestess of Apollo, I had to go through a few layers — book publicist and agent—and the answers I received back can best be described as intriguing and esoteric; they varied in length from a few words to a paragraph to no response at all. Every reply was also written in all lower case, including the first-person singular “i,” an idiosyncrasy that seemed almost playful, and is something I usually see in the prose or text messages of a student or a younger person. Like a Greek hearing those ambiguous missives given by the Pythia, I was repeatedly surprised by the puzzling, thought-provoking answers I received.

Source: The Anne Carson Interview | Quarterly Conversation

Cornelia Barber in Conversation with Ana Božičević | Lemon Hound

Cornelia Barber in Conversation with Ana Božičević | Lemon Hound.

H.D. (Hilda Doolittle): Euripides: The Chorus to Iphigeneia | TOM CLARK

(To Iphigeneia)

Your hair is scattered light:
The Greeks will bind it with petals.

And like a little beast,
Dappled and without horns,
That scampered on the hill-rocks,
They will leave you
With stained throat —
Though you never cropped hill-grass
To the reed-cry
And the shepherd’s note.

Some Greek hero is cheated
And your mother’s court
Of its bride.

And we ask this — where truth is,
Of what use is valour and is worth?
For evil has conquered the race,
There is no power but in base men,
Nor any man whom the gods do not hate.

 

H.D. (Hilda Doolittle) (1886-1961): Chorus to Iphigeneia, from Choruses from The Iphigeneia in Aulis and the Hippolytus of Euripides, The Egoist, London, 1919

TOM CLARK.