Posts Tagged ‘ haiku ’

Today’s Haiku (January 9, 2019) | Blue Willow Haiku World (by Fay Aoyagi)

外套の襟立てて世に容れられず   加藤楸邨

gaitô no eri tatete yo ni irerarezu

I turn up my coat’s collar

not being accepted

in the world

Shuson Kato

translation by Fay Aoyagi

from “Haiku-kai” (“Haiku World,” a monthly haiku magazine),  July 2017 Issue,  Bungaku No Mori, Tokyo

Fay’s Note:  Shuson Kato (1905-1993)

Source: Today’s Haiku (January 9, 2019) | Blue Willow Haiku World (by Fay Aoyagi)

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Today’s Haiku (January 10, 2019) | Blue Willow Haiku World (by Fay Aoyagi)

生きてゐる冬の泉を聴くために    杉山久子

ikiteiru fuyu no izumi o kiku tame ni

I live

to listen

the winter spring

Hisako Sugiyama

translation by Fay Aoyagi

from ‘Izumi’ (‘Spring’) haiku collection by Hisako Sugiyama, Furansu-do, Tokyo 2015

Fay’s Note:   Last line may not work well in English.   ‘sprng’ here is not the season between winter and summer, but a place where water comes to the surface from underground.

Source: Today’s Haiku (January 10, 2019) | Blue Willow Haiku World (by Fay Aoyagi)

Today’s Haiku (January 8, 2019) | Blue Willow Haiku World (by Fay Aoyagi)

降る雪や地上のすべてゆるされたり  野見山朱鳥

furu yuki ya chijyô no subete yurusaretari

falling snow—

everything on the earth

granted

Asuka Nomiyama

from “Haiku-kai” (“Haiku World,” a monthly haiku magazine), July 2017 Issue,  Bungaku No Mori, Tokyo

translated by Fay Aoyagi

Fay’s Note:   Asuka Nomiyama (1917-1970)

Source: Today’s Haiku (January 8, 2019) | Blue Willow Haiku World (by Fay Aoyagi)

First Known When Lost: Gifts

“October 6, 1940.  Late in the season as it is, a dragonfly has appeared and is flying around me.  Keep on flying as long as you can  — your flying days will soon be over.”

Taneda Santōka (1882-1940) (translated by Burton Watson), in Burton Watson, For All My Walking:  Free-Verse Haiku of Taneda Santōka with Excerpts from His Diaries (Columbia University Press 2003), page 102.

The passage is lovely in itself, but it moves into a deeper dimension when one considers the life of Taneda Santōka.  When he was eleven years old, his mother committed suicide by drowning herself in a well.  Santōka watched as her body was pulled from the well.  He attended Waseda University in Tokyo for a year, but was forced to leave due to a drinking problem, which persisted throughout his life. He married, but the marriage ended in divorce.  He entered into a business venture (a sake brewery) with his father, but the business failed.  After he unsuccessfully attempted to commit suicide by standing in front of a train, he was taken in by the head priest of a Zen Buddhist temple.  At the age of 43, he was ordained as a Zen priest.

After serving briefly as the caretaker of a temple, he became a mendicant monk, spending much of the remainder of his life on constant walking journeys throughout Japan, in all seasons — walking and walking, forever walking.  He survived by begging and by sleeping in cheap inns or, often, out in the open air.  But he maintained a loyal group of friends who came to his aid when times were most difficult.  And, through it all, he wrote haiku — lovely and moving haiku.  He died in his sleep at the age of 58.

Burton Watson appends the following note to the passage by Santōka quoted above:  “This is the last entry in Santōka’s diary, written four days before his death.”

*  *  *  *  *  *

As midnight approaches on New Year’s Eve in Japan, the bells in Buddhist temples are sounded 108 times:  once for each of the sins and desires that we should seek to rid ourselves of.  At this time each year I am reminded of a haiku:

I intended
Never to grow old, —
But the temple bell sounds.

Jokun (translated by R. H. Blyth), in R. H. Blyth, Haiku, Volume 4: Autumn-Winter (Hokuseido Press 1952), page 202.

So it is in this dragonfly World of ours, a World in which each year, each moment, is a gift.

Source: First Known When Lost: Gifts

 

late winter –

the dragonfly world

of a snowflake

 

– Donna Fleischer
from Under the Bashō

 

haiku – vengodalmare

 

butterflies
barely touch the meadow . . .
killing frost

Donna Fleischer

~~~
* in copertina
ph. Christian Bragg

 

Source: haiku – vengodalmare

in Autumn Moon Haiku Journal

Autumn Moon Haiku Journal, Volume 2:1, Autumn / Winter  2018 – 2019 

butterflies
barely touch the meadow . . .
killing frost
Donna Fleischer, USA

 

Source: Autumn Moon Haiku Journal – Home

Andrew Kojima – Chef Koj – Haiku and Sake | Burn The Water

Working with Andrew Kojima (Koj) at his fantastic Japanese restaurant in Cheltenham was great! As part of the Times & Sunday Times Cheltenham Literature Festival where I was Haiku Poet in Residence. . .

Source: Andrew Kojima – Chef Koj – Haiku and Sake | Burn The Water

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