Posts Tagged ‘ ideas ’

The Rumpus Interview With Lidia Yuknavitch – The Rumpus.net

The Rumpus Interview With Lidia Yuknavitch – The Rumpus.net.

Conceptual Writings: An Overview | Article | CCCB LAB

Teacher. N/D. Source: Flickr

Conceptual Writings: An Overview | Article | CCCB LAB.

“Objects and Ideas” Curated by Bob Calafiore – 2.12.15 – 3.14.15 Five Points Gallery

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Torre Di Vetro, Due, Unique C-Print, 40″x30″, Robert Calafiore

Five Points Gallery

David Byrne – I Don’t Care about Contemporary Art Anymore?

An untitled work known as one of “The Megalopolises,” by Marcel Storr.

David Byrne – I Don’t Care about Contemporary Art Anymore?.

Interview with Lynne DeSilva-Johnson of The Operating System, part two| Book Culture Blog

 

L-R: Fr. Frank Sabatte, Michael Berube, and Keena Gonzales (all Openings Collective, NYC), Jacob Perkins and Matt Nelson (Mellow Pages), Center: Lynne DeSilva-Johnson, Georgia Elrod (Painter, Heliopolis Project Space), Shana Maurizi (Filmmaker, WORK ONLY), Montana Ray (BLT Salon, Poets House Fellow), and the feet of Kevin William Reed (Drive By Press), and Seldon Yuan (SSCY, Center for Book Arts).

The Operating System Q & A pt 2 | Book Culture Blog.

Caroline Kennedy, U.S. Ambassador to Japan, Judges First Haiku Contest in Kagoshima | ASAHI HAIKUIST SPECIAL

 

Caroline Kennedy, U.S. Ambassador to Japan

ASAHI HAIKUIST SPECIAL/ U.S. Ambassador Judges First Haiku Contest in Kagoshima – AJW by The Asahi Shimbun.

100 Ideas That Changed Photography / Brain Pickings

100 Ideas That Changed Photography | Brain Pickings.

An excellent link to the cyanotypes or “ocean flowers” of the first woman photographer, Anna Atkins follows from the collections of the New York Public Library: Anna Atkins

Eleanor Roosevelt Quotation Poster, “Great minds . . . “

A Carefully Crafted F**k You, Nathan Schneider interviews Judith Butler – Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics

A Carefully Crafted F**k You, Nathan Schneider interviews Judith Butler – Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics.

All I really have to say about life is that for it to be regarded as valuable, it has to first be regarded as grievable. A life that is in some sense socially dead or already “lost” cannot be grieved when it is actually destroyed. And I think we can see that entire populations are regarded as negligible life by warring powers, and so when they are destroyed, there is no great sense that a heinous act and egregious loss have taken place. My question is: how do we understand this nefarious distinction that gets set up between grievable and ungrievable lives?”~ Judith Butler

” Thinking can take place in and as embodied action. It is not necessarily a quiet or passive activity. Civil disobedience can be an act of thinking, of mindfully opposing police force, for instance. I continue to believe in demonstrations, but I think they have to be sustained.” ~ Judith Butler

I am not sure that the work is “inner” in the way that Gandhi described. But I do think that one has to remain vigilant in relation to one’s own aggression, to craft and direct it in ways that are effective. This work on the self, though, takes place through certain practices, and by noticing where one is, how angry one is, and even comporting oneself differently over time. I think this has to be a social practice, one that we undertake with others. That support and solidarity are crucial to maintaining it. Otherwise, we think we should become heroic individuals, and that takes us away from effective collective action.” ~ Judith Butler

So we might consider: what practices embody interdependency and equality in ways that might mitigate the practice of war waging? My wager is that there are many. . . .   am trying to bring together people to think about new forms of war and war waging, the place of media in the waging of war, and ways of thinking about violence that can take account of new forms of conflict that do not comply with conventional definitions of war. This will involve considering traditional definitions of war in political science and international law, but also new forms of conflict, theories of violence, and humanistic inquiries into why people wage war as they do. I’m also interested in linking this with studies of ecology, toxic soil, and damaged life.” ~ Judith Butler

On December 3 – Occupy to Celebrate: The Resilience of OWS

December 3 – #Occupy Wall Street