Posts Tagged ‘ Ireland ’

Ireland Votes to Legalize Abortion in Blow to Catholic Conservatism – The New York Times

The referendum repeals the Eighth Amendment of the Irish Constitution — a 1983 measure that banned abortion under almost all circumstances.CreditJeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Ireland is about to elect a 38-year-old gay Asian doctor as its next prime minister — Quartz

Groundbreaking. (Reuters/Clodagh Kilcoyne)

The fiercely Catholic country, which only legalized homosexuality in 1993, is setting a global example.

Source: Ireland is about to elect a 38-year-old gay Asian doctor as its next prime minister — Quartz

Translating Borges into Trees: An Interview with Book Artist Katie Holten – Asymptote Blog

I’m fascinated by our understanding—and misunderstanding— of the systems around us. Man-made systems, like cities for example, mirror microscopic bacterial colonies. Yet we humans tend to see them (cities, or indeed most man-made things) as being something completely removed and separate from ‘nature’. These colonies, whether fungal, organic, man-made, microscopic, or intergalactic, all mirror each other with similar growth patterns that repeat at different scales. These clustering, branching patterns shape everything from our lungs and neural pathways to cracks in the mud, lightning, river estuaries, evolutionary paths, language development, algorithms, and the Internet. There’s something about trees that’s universal. – Katie Holten

Translating Borges into Trees: An Interview with Book Artist Katie Holten – Asymptote Blog.

Ireland Votes to Approve Gay Marriage, Putting Country in Vanguard – NYTimes.com

Supporters celebrated a historic vote to legalize same-sex marriage on Saturday in Dublin.Credit

Aidan Crawley/European Pressphoto Agency

Ireland Votes to Approve Gay Marriage, Putting Country in Vanguard – NYTimes.com.

Ireland’s gay marriage referendum – the Guardian briefing

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A gay rights mural decorates the side of a building in central Dublin. Photograph: Shawn Pogatchnik/AP

Ireland’s Gay Rights Referendum | The Guardian

A gay rights mural decorates the side of a building in central Dublin. Photograph: Shawn Pogatchnik/AP

William Butler Yeats – Easter 1916

I

I have met them at close of day
Coming with vivid faces
From counter or desk among grey
Eighteenth-century houses.
I have passed with a nod of the head
Or polite meaningless words,
Or have lingered awhile and said
Polite meaningless words,
And thought before I had done
Of a mocking tale or a gibe
To please a companion
Around the fire at the club,
Being certain that they and I
But lived where motley is worn:
All changed, changed utterly:
A terrible beauty is born.

II

That woman’s days were spent
In ignorant good will,
Her nights in argument
Until her voice grew shrill.
What voice more sweet than hers
When young and beautiful,
She rode to harriers?
This man had kept a school
And rode our winged horse.
This other his helper and friend
Was coming into his force;
He might have won fame in the end,
So sensitive his nature seemed,
So daring and sweet his thought.
This other man I had dreamed
A drunken, vain-glorious lout.
He had done most bitter wrong
To some who are near my heart,
Yet I number him in the song;
He, too, has resigned his part
In the casual comedy;
He, too, has been changed in his turn,
Transformed utterly:
A terrible beauty is born.

III

Hearts with one purpose alone
Through summer and winter, seem
Enchanted to a stone
To trouble the living stream.
The horse that comes from the road,
The rider, the birds that range
From cloud to tumbling cloud,
Minute by minute change.
A shadow of cloud on the stream
Changes minute by minute;
A horse-hoof slides on the brim;
And a horse plashes within it
Where long-legged moor-hens dive
And hens to moor-cocks call.
Minute by minute they live:
The stone’s in the midst of all.

IV

Too long a sacrifice
Can make a stone of the heart.
O when may it suffice?
That is heaven’s part, our part
To murmur name upon name,
As a mother names her child
When sleep at last has come
On limbs that had run wild.
What is it but nightfall?
No, no, not night but death.
Was it needless death after all?
For England may keep faith
For all that is done and said.
We know their dream; enough
To know they dreamed and are dead.
And what if excess of love
Bewildered them till they died?
I write it out in a verse —
MacDonagh and MacBride
And Connolly and Pearse
Now and in time to be,
Wherever green is worn,
Are changed, changed utterly:
A terrible beauty is born.

Yeats – Easter 1916.

Seamus Heaney poem chosen as Ireland’s best-loved – RTÉ News

Seamus Heaney’s ‘When All the Others were Away at Mass’ has been chosen as Ireland’s best-loved poem

When all the others were away at Mass 

In Memoriam M.K.H., 1911-1984

When all the others were away at Mass
I was all hers as we peeled potatoes.
They broke the silence, let fall one by one
Like solder weeping off the soldering iron:
Cold comforts set between us, things to share
Gleaming in a bucket of clean water.
And again let fall. Little pleasant splashes
From each other’s work would bring us to our senses.
So while the parish priest at her bedside
Went hammer and tongs at the prayers for the dying
And some were responding and some crying
I remembered her head bent towards my head,
Her breath in mine, our fluent dipping knives –
Never closer the whole rest of our lives.

 

 

 

Seamus Heaney poem chosen as Ireland’s best-loved – RTÉ News.

Peter Paul and Mary, The Rising of the Moon

Peter Paul and Mary, The Rising of the Moon

Van Morrison & Bob Dylan in Athens

– thanks to Maxwell Owen Clark for sharing this, and as he has written, “so heartbreaking from anyone the least bit sympathetic to the Irish’s plight.”