Posts Tagged ‘ Judith Butler ’

Judith Butler Wants Us to Reshape Our Rage | The New Yorker

The celebrity academic on the possibilities of nonviolence, the rise of the anti-“gender ideology” movement, and the militant potential of mourning.

Source: Judith Butler Wants Us to Reshape Our Rage | The New Yorker

On Inequality Angela Davis and Judith Butler in Conversation – YouTube

Zeitgeist Spam: Nuestra America: Feral Theory

If, following Rubin, Frye, and Polish, to become women was to be domesticated, it would seem that undoing gender, to borrow Judith Butler’s phrase, would mean going feral. Monique Wittig long ago described lesbians as “escapees” from gender. Wittig’s renegade lesbian is no longer a woman; like the avian inmate who flees the farm, or the dog who joins the wolves, she has gone feral.

Zeitgeist Spam: Nuestra America: Feral Theory.

Notes on Impressions and Responsiveness | Prof Judith Butler (2015)

Demonstrating Precarity: Vulnerability, Embodiment, and Resistance | The Los Angeles Review of Books

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Judith Butler and Arne De Boever

Demonstrating Precarity: Vulnerability, Embodiment, and Resistance | The Los Angeles Review of Books.

(2014) Judith Butler: Speaking of Rage and Grief

Hélène Cixous, Judith Butler, Emily Apter, and Ronell :: The New School, NYC

Judith Butler And The Cause Of The Other :: Los Angeles Review of Books

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Judith Butler And The Cause Of The Other :: Los Angeles Review of Books

Philosopher Judith Butler on Doubting Love / Brain Pickings

Philosopher Judith Butler on Doubting Love | Brain Pickings.

A Carefully Crafted F**k You, Nathan Schneider interviews Judith Butler – Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics

A Carefully Crafted F**k You, Nathan Schneider interviews Judith Butler – Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics.

All I really have to say about life is that for it to be regarded as valuable, it has to first be regarded as grievable. A life that is in some sense socially dead or already “lost” cannot be grieved when it is actually destroyed. And I think we can see that entire populations are regarded as negligible life by warring powers, and so when they are destroyed, there is no great sense that a heinous act and egregious loss have taken place. My question is: how do we understand this nefarious distinction that gets set up between grievable and ungrievable lives?”~ Judith Butler

” Thinking can take place in and as embodied action. It is not necessarily a quiet or passive activity. Civil disobedience can be an act of thinking, of mindfully opposing police force, for instance. I continue to believe in demonstrations, but I think they have to be sustained.” ~ Judith Butler

I am not sure that the work is “inner” in the way that Gandhi described. But I do think that one has to remain vigilant in relation to one’s own aggression, to craft and direct it in ways that are effective. This work on the self, though, takes place through certain practices, and by noticing where one is, how angry one is, and even comporting oneself differently over time. I think this has to be a social practice, one that we undertake with others. That support and solidarity are crucial to maintaining it. Otherwise, we think we should become heroic individuals, and that takes us away from effective collective action.” ~ Judith Butler

So we might consider: what practices embody interdependency and equality in ways that might mitigate the practice of war waging? My wager is that there are many. . . .   am trying to bring together people to think about new forms of war and war waging, the place of media in the waging of war, and ways of thinking about violence that can take account of new forms of conflict that do not comply with conventional definitions of war. This will involve considering traditional definitions of war in political science and international law, but also new forms of conflict, theories of violence, and humanistic inquiries into why people wage war as they do. I’m also interested in linking this with studies of ecology, toxic soil, and damaged life.” ~ Judith Butler