Posts Tagged ‘ language ’

Interchange – The Unknown Knowns of Cultural Diplomacy – WFHB

Richard Wright (left) and fellow delegates at the First Congress of Black Writers and Artists, Paris, 1956.

For today’s episode producer Bella Bravo spoke with poet Juliana Spahr about her book, Du Bois’s Telegram: Literary Resistance and State Containment. This close study of how state interests have shaped contemporary U.S. literature was published by Harvard University Press in 2018.

In Du Bois’s Telegram, Spahr investigates the relationship between politics and art. Her research focuses on the institutional forces at work during three moments in U.S. literature that sought to defy political orthodoxies through challenging linguistic conventions: first, the avant-garde modernism of the early twentieth century; second, the resistance-movement writing of the 1960s and 1970s; and, finally, in the twenty-first century, the abundance of English-language works integrating languages other than English.

 

Source: Interchange – The Unknown Knowns of Cultural Diplomacy – WFHB

On Language and Humanity: In Conversation With Noam Chomsky | The MIT Press Reader

“For the first time I think that the Holy Grail is at least in view in some core areas, maybe even within reach.” Image: Wikimedia Commons

The father of modern linguistics is still opening up new kinds of questions and topics for inquiry.

Source: On Language and Humanity: In Conversation With Noam Chomsky | The MIT Press Reader

How Language Shapes the Way We Think

At the TEDWomen 2017 conference, cognitive scientist Lera Boroditsky gave a talk on how different languages affect how their speakers think about the world. It ended up being the most viewed online TED Talk in 2018.

Source: How Language Shapes the Way We Think

Chiflidos en la neblina [Whistles in the Mist]- YouTube

Poem of the Week: Stephen Collis from Once in Blockadia – LEMON HOUND 3.0

 

Come the Revolution

Come the revolution / we will the revolution / we will return to the revolution / return to the sensuous body of language / come the revolution / we will return to the / sensuous body and / sound will propel us / through the barricades of others the revolution / through the barricades of otherness / and come as mere sparks will / spark us come the revolution anew / and we will the revolution come anew / and irony will no longer bind us / the sensuous body of language lift us / fringe to feather to fold us / the sensuous body of our methods / singletogetherness / and come the revolution / we will have time / the revolutionary time / to live the silent lives of animals / the revolutionary animals we have lost / that is animals we have killed / the extinctions corrupt economies / come the revolution throwing / throwing off sparks and new economies and / sound will propel us through the revolution sensuous / the animals we are sensuous as climates / as producers and consumers / as time and sound and / the sensuous body of language / will come the revolution when / banks will have shaken / banks shaken to shivers / shivers come the revolution / all fossils fuel for their own revolution / will come and walking as sound / through sensuous bodies formed we will walk / through an endless park / sensuous a park will walk from each of our abilities / to each of our needs / through sound the revolution / come sensuous come stroll / come the revolution we will / roll through bird song and / singular birches come / the transformations of home and together / the revolution this ecos will echo the /sensuous body I speak of / as system as living fabric come / together the revolution through this other’s / effulgence so others / other species climates come the revolution / we will echo new limits we will / wrap self-governance in limits in species in webs / wrap the sensuous body in webs / of human tongue and animal revolution / self-governance in bios in animal / wrap sound all lifted to be level / to small habitations and habits to be level / as animal and sound and sensuous bodies / small hearths of animals own / all of us all animals not owning joining / come the revolution we will / come to be animal to be sound / sing the revolution we will / sing the swords out of songs / sing swords into songs / songs through flowers through fields / sing bees through these fields / sing carbon out of atmospheres / sing chemicals out of oceans / sing economies incapacities even / sing balance sing home sustainable / sing sustainable come sound / sensuous bodies sustainable / sing songs of the absence of oil and death in the oceans // unsustainable // of tanks and guns and airstrikes // unsustainable // of endless colonial occupations // unsustainable // profit motive and equity investments // unsustainable // sing come the revolution / sing a jubilee for all the revolution / sing come hammer come storm / the revolution will come and we will / as animals as sensuous bodies / begin to be bornCome the revolution / shit will no longer be fucked up and bullshit / and that which is loving in our hands / will touch that which is loving in each and every others’ hands / and while reading this poem / still won’t be the same / as storming a bank oil refinery or a parliament / you may yet be reading this poem / to a group of people with whom you will presently / be storming a bank oil refinery or a parliament Come the Revolution can be found in Stephen Collis’ Once in Blockadia, published in 2010 by Talon Books.

Source: Poem of the Week: Stephen Collis from Once in Blockadia – LEMON HOUND 3.0

Tracing Szilárd Borbély’s Poetry in The Dispossessed | Asymptote

Dispossessed

 

Because language is like night-time. Moist,
an indecipherable series of grunts. Pure dread, and
inchoate visceral shrieking. It is inhuman.

from “On the wings of freedom”

Tracing Szilárd Borbély’s Poetry in The Dispossessed | Asymptote

Mary Beard’s new book charts the deep-rooted history of keeping women silent

Philomela_Procne_e_Tereus_-_Sebastiano_Del_Piombo_Villa_Farnesina-620x353

Philomela, Procne e Tereus – Sebastiano Del Piombo, Villa Farnesina

Women & Power: A Manifesto by Mary Beard | Prospect Magazine