Posts Tagged ‘ mountain ’

Rough Old-Time Mountain Folk Make The Best Music – YouTube

Himuro | Icebox

Himuro

外は夏あたりの水は秋にして内は冬なる氷室山かな (藤原良経)

The air about, that of summer;
its flowing stream water
has an autumnal feel:
but beneath the ground, Mt. Himuro
is winter to its core
…………………….. (waka by Fujiwara Yoshitsune)

Source: Himuro | Icebox

Blue Willow Haiku World (by Fay Aoyagi) | Haiku

人のこゑ人を呼ぶこゑ山眠る  菅野孝夫

hito no koe hito o yobu koe yama nemuru

someone’s voice

a voice to call someone…

a mountain sleeps

Takao Sugano

from ‘Haidan,’ (‘Haiku Stage’) a monthly haiku magazine, March 2017  Issue, Honami Shoten, Tokyo

Fay Aoyagi, translation. Fay’s Note:  ‘yama nemuru’ (a mountain sleeps) is a winter kigo

Source: Blue Willow Haiku World (by Fay Aoyagi) | Haiku

First Known When Lost: Rocks And Stones

In Chinese poetry, one often hears of recluses living in the mountains amidst the rocks and stones and trees and mists and white clouds. They might be Buddhist monks or Taoist adepts or woodcutters. Chinese poets would go in search of them in order to obtain wisdom, but would usually come back without having found them.  They would then write a poem about their journey.

However, a few of the recluses were themselves poets.  They are more circumspect than Coleridge and Wordsworth when it comes to the place of rocks and stones in the larger scheme of things.  They are not fond of abstractions and explanations.  They point things out.

In Reply to Questions

I happened to come to the foot of a pine tree,
lay down and slept soundly on pillows of stone.
There are no calendars here in the mountain;
the cold passes but I don’t know what year it is.

The Recluse T’ai-Shang (T’ang Dynasty; dates of birth and death unknown) (translated by Burton Watson), in Burton Watson, The Columbia Book of Chinese Poetry: From Early Times to the Thirteenth Century (Columbia University Press 1984), page 294.

Source: First Known When Lost: Rocks And Stones

Koans for the Anthropocene: Tea in the Dark (Tea #1) | FOP

image: for Genzan and Naoko, Tea in the Dark (Drinking Tea, Foot Before, Foot Behind (cleaving dusk/dawn), smudge studio 002019

Ancestor Exalt/Gazing at the Sacred Peak

What is this ancestor Exalt Mountain like?
Endless greens of north and south meeting

where Changemaker distills divine beauty,
where yin and yang cleave dusk and dawn.

Chest heaving breathes out cloud, and eyes
open dusk bird-flight home. One day soon,

on the summit, peaks ranging away will be
small enough to hold, all in a single place.

Tu Fu (717-770 C.E), translation David Hinton

Source: Koans for the Anthropocene: Tea in the Dark (Tea #1) | FOP

is/let • a haiku by Rebecca Lilly

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Source: is/let

Persimmons – Part 1 | Icebox

Persimmons – part 1

I have a persimmon tree in front of my room. It has produced a rich harvest this year. In fact, like many other fruit trees, it bears a lot of fruit every other year. However, the persimmons this tree produces are very small, less than the size of ping-pong balls. I believe this tree was here long before the garden was made, and that it belongs to the species called Yamagaki (Mountain Persimmon). Its fruits are probably very sour and nobody cares for them, but as autumn deepens, their colour also deepens, till birds come and peck at them. This is the tree’s only use, but when I see it growing in the shadow of a big cherry, doing its best to survive, I cannot help cheering it on.
………………  Time for persimmons
………………  To mature and redden —
………………  The sky is so blue.
I have been close to persimmons since my childhood. We had a persimmon tree in our garden when I was at primary school. My father fastened sturdy ropes around one of its branches and made a swing for me. I was very proud of it and happily swung back and forth on it, but one day the branch broke off without warning and threw both the swing and me to the ground. Fortunately, I landed on a soft lawn, so I escaped with only scratches to my knees. This experience taught me, though, that persimmon trees were easily broken, and since then I have made it a rule not to climb them.

During our wartime evacuation, I enjoyed sweet persimmons. The earliest kind we had was called Bongineri (Bon-Festival Sweet Persimmon). Its fruits were small and had lots of seeds, but their flesh, strewn with black flecks resembling sesame seeds, was delicious. Later in autumn I would enjoy large persimmons that had been sweetened in rice chests — so big and sweet that I found them satisfying in every sense. Occasionally I enjoyed the special variety called Saijogaki (Saijo Persimmons), which I thought to be a real treasure.
………………  The sweet persimmons
………………  With dots like sesame seeds —
………………  Everyone eats laughing.

………………  Sweetened persimmons
………………  Melt on our tongues, so slow to
………………  Reach our stomachs.

sleeve (無為 – daoism and inhabiting porosity – FOP (friends of the pleistocene)

 

inhabiting porosity | fop

Spiritual Poetry by Jane Hirshfield | Poetry Foundation

Zazen on Ching-t’ing Mountain

The birds have vanished down the sky.
Now the last cloud drains away.

We sit together, the mountain and me,
until only the mountain remains.

Li Po (China, 701-762) [translated by Sam Hamill]

22 poems about spirituality and enlightenment.

Source: Spiritual Poetry by Jane Hirshfield | Poetry Foundation

Plum Blossoms I | Icebox

Plum Blossoms I

The following is the first part of a recent haibun by Nobuyuki Yuasa (Sosui).

The fragrance of plums —

Suddenly the sun comes up

On the mountain path.                 Basho

Plum blossoms are beautiful, especially in the morning when their colours are highlighted; yet plums appeal not only to the eye but also to the nose. In fact, the scent of their blossoms is their greatest charm. When their aroma is carried on a gentle spring breeze, I am captivated by its nobility and find nothing else capable of rivalling it. In the garden I can see from my windows, white plums are just now coming out — one or two already fully out, but the rest still pinkish-white balls, some swollen and others small. It is plum blossoms at this stage that I love best, for they give us hope and trust in the future. A week from now, they will be in full bloom. Then I can enjoy their fragrance. On warm days, I shall open my windows wide to enjoy it, far superior to any artificial perfume.

I know there are plums

In the recess of darkness —

Deeply scented winds.                  Sosui

 

Source: Plum Blossoms I | Icebox