Posts Tagged ‘ photography ’

Damo Suzuki – Gerald Jenkins / Photographer

Source: Gerald Jenkins / Photographer

Dorothea Lange’s Angel of History

DOROTHEA LANGE, BERRYESSA VALLEY, NAPA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, 1956, GELATIN SILVER PRINT, PRINTED 1965, 11 1/8″ × 11 1/2″. THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK. PURCHASE.

Rebecca Solnit studies Dorothea Lange’s 1956 photograph ‘Berryessa Valley, Napa County, California.’

Source: Dorothea Lange’s Angel of History

The Sublime Farewell of Gerhard Richter, Master of Doubt – The New York Times

Credit…Museum Ludwig

 

Credit…Charlie Rubin for The New York Times

 

Credit…Charlie Rubin for The New York Times

Threshold – Maureen O’Connor Photography

 

 

The Crows At Your Table

 

 

Looking Back

 

 

Stories From My Dad

Source: Threshold – Maureen O’Connor Photography

Sean Bonney | Notes on Baudelaire – BLACKOUT ((poetry & politics))

 

 

Lee Miller | Women Firewatchers, London (1940)

“I will get a map of London to see where Hackney is” – Ed Dorn “. . . left the ruins, climbed out from under the white stones” – Amiri Baraka     (((1))) …

Source: Sean Bonney | Notes on Baudelaire – BLACKOUT ((poetry & politics))

Zanele Muholi: Paying Homage to the History of Black Women – The New York Times

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Muholi, who eschews gender-specific pronouns, is co-founder of the Forum for the Empowerment of Women, which advocates for the rights of black lesbians in South Africa, as well as the founder of Inkanyiso, a collective for queer activism and visual media. Activism is central to Muholi’s photographs, work that taps into the tradition of empowerment through black self-representation. Since the 19th century, the photographic portrait has allowed black people to represent themselves as they want to be seen, not how others pigeonhole or even dismiss them. – Maurice Berger

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“Too often I find we are being mimicked, and distorted, by the privileged other,” said Muholi. “We are here; we have our own voices; we have our own lives.” In this regard, the photographer wants to “teach people about our history, to rethink what history is all about, to reclaim it for ourselves, to encourage people to use artistic tools such as cameras as weapons to fight back.” – Zanele Muholi

Removing Suicide as the Filter for Experiencing Francesca Woodman’s Photography

Francesca Woodman, untitled photograph (circa 1975-1978), gelatin silver print (courtesy George Lange © Estate of Francesca Woodman / Charles Woodman / Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York)

From an uncovered box of photographs and ephemera, a portrayal of Francesca Woodman emerges that sheds new light on the enigmatic photographer.

Source: Removing Suicide as the Filter for Experiencing Francesca Woodman’s Photography