Posts Tagged ‘ power ’

Opinion | Elena Ferrante: A Power of Our Own – The New York Times

I’ve never been particularly swayed by the rhetorical formula “At last, a woman president!” — or prime minister, or Nobel winner, or any other position atop our current political or cultural hierarchies. The question is, rather: Within what culture, within what system of power, are women rising to the top?

Pressing changes are underway. Everything is becoming something else, unpredictably. A completely new outlook is required. The challenge for now and the foreseeable future is to extract ourselves from what men have engineered: a planet long on the edge of catastrophe. – Elena Ferrante

I oversaw the U.S. nuclear power industry. Now I think it should be banned. – The Washington Post

 

(Olivier Bonhomme/For The Washington Post)

The danger from climate change no longer outweighs the risks of nuclear accidents.

Source: I oversaw the U.S. nuclear power industry. Now I think it should be banned. – The Washington Post

Mary Beard’s new book charts the deep-rooted history of keeping women silent

Philomela_Procne_e_Tereus_-_Sebastiano_Del_Piombo_Villa_Farnesina-620x353

Philomela, Procne e Tereus – Sebastiano Del Piombo, Villa Farnesina

Women & Power: A Manifesto by Mary Beard | Prospect Magazine

Audre Lorde reads Uses of the Erotic: The Erotic as Power

The Mosuo – If Women Ruled the World | New Humanist

Mosuo people live on Lugu Hu lake, Yunnan province, China. Mosuo are known for their matriarchal society, where women rule.. Image shot 2008. Exact date unknown.

Mosuo people live on Lugu Hu lake, Yunnan province, China. Mosuo are known for their matriarchal society, where women rule.. Image shot 2008. Exact date unknown.

 

The Mosuo – If Women Ruled the World | New Humanist

A Review of Irradiated Cities by Mariko Nagai – decomP magazinE

Human suffering is central here, but more unsettling is how inflicting such catastrophe can be rationalized, ignored, fictionalized, denied. Nuclear power is only one form of deadly power under examination in this book, which looks, too, at power and power imbalance on global and local levels, from the capitalist interests in locating a power plant in a certain, cash-thirsty town to the nationalist interests that see in irradiated rocks a potential leveling force. We are made to see “power” as something invisible, taken-for-granted and recklessly consumed, with even those citizens who organize for anti-nuclear protests doing so via text messages sent using electricity, dependent upon and addicted to a vast grid of infrastructure. – Spencer Dew

decomP, founded in 2004, is a monthly, online magazine that publishes prose, poetry, art, and book reviews.

Source: decomP magazinE

An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth To Power | Windybee’s Blog

Screening at the Cannes Film Festival, An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth To Power, directed by Bonni Cohen and Jon Shenk, is the follow-up to the 2006 groundbreaking documentary, An Inconvenient Truth,…

Source: An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth To Power | Windybee’s Blog