Posts Tagged ‘ series ’

Things that Quicken the Heart: Animals in Art – Adam Fuss

Muted Mutations at Every Shadow Is Her Dream — The Photography of Stasja Voluti, with a poem by Donna Fleischer

Muted Mutations / The Photography of Stasja Voluti

on three photographs by
Stasja Voluti

aqueous light

of ambergris submerges

the man’s downcast and

bearded face

he sleepwalks in its

mutable saffron folds

an ancient waiting of

the just before

or the still holding just

after

Donna Fleischer
February 21, 2012

Nukeletter 14 of Nukeletters 1 – 14, by Scott Watson, from Sendai, Japan

Nukeletter 14

Last week a Japanese English language daily reported that to decontaminate the 8 per cent of Japan (land Japan) that is now radioactive due to the Fukushima nuke (though the report says nothing of radiation that might have come or be coming from releases from other nuclear facilities in Japan or elsewhere) only the upper two centimeters of soil must be removed.

Another newspaper report tells us that Japan’s Self-Defense Forces will be given the cleanup job. Reasonable enough, maybe, since there is no pressing military engagement (as far as we know) that requires the efforts of the 239,430 members in service (as of 2005, and that number represents ground troops only).

The largest threat to Japan is its own nukes. That said, it brings to mind the more than 2,000 Americans killed in the 9-11 terrorist attack and the far larger number of Americans who may have been killed by radiation over the years since that nation went nuclear.

Ernest Sternglass some years back wrote a book about low-level radiation. His book is now online and free [http://www.ratical.org/radiation/SecretFallout/SFchp6.html]. Some people disagree with his findings and some agencies refused to cooperate with his investigations by sharing results from other studies. I can’t say for sure that what ES reports is true. Nor can I say that it is not true.

What I can say is that a nuclear world puts citizens in a negative situation in which no one knows what to believe. To believe or not to believe. The safe/not safe issue can go on forever, with each side endlessly going on with “yes it is” “no it’s not.” The only way to free ourselves from this particular absurd and uneven debate is to move towards a nuclear free world.

It’s true that being alive in this world requires us to make decisions about many things. I don’t know that we as a species are capable of being right about anything, or if there is such a thing as right in nature outside the human mind. It might be wise to not trust our species, to not assume we are capable of making the right decisions. Let earth and sky decide. Earth says a certain amount of background radiation that comes from earth itself is okay. It is wise for us to listen.

[This scroll-like series of Scott Watson’s Nukeletters, written by the poet, writer, editor and publisher, is presented unedited and in its ongoing entirety here at Word Pond. One Nukeletter will be posted each successive day through the completed set of 14 to date. Beyond that, a Nukeletter will be posted as soon as it becomes available. Scott Watson lives in Sendai, Japan. All rights are  © Scott Watson. Word Pond  is deeply grateful for the author’s permission to share this remarkable series.]

Nukeletter 11 of Nukeletters 1 – 14, by Scott Watson, from Sendai, Japan

Nukeletter 11

Coming Home. (Preparing for a trip back to USA.)
give us your
huddled masses
*****
will radiation on my passport break their
machine?
*****
is it okay to bring this
contaminated body into
pure US of A?
*****
I have no gun but am I
a radiation threat?
will tough guy TSA
break my head like
huddled masses poor?
will they shout and scream
“get on your knees!” “get on the floor!”
left leg on red, right hand on orange?
will everything I say be twisted
if I swear to tell the truth
in a nation at lie with itself?
*****
go ahead and frisk me.
be sure to wash after.
sue me later.
*****
Iʼll understand if you donʼt kiss me,
hug me, touch me. this poemʼs
for you.
*****
TOO LATE
warning!
these
words set down by a
man dying may be
contagious.
donʼt read them!
*****
mother scolds a contami-
nated child for pissing in a
contaminated stream.
*****
radioactive
haiku light as air
we breathe

 

[This scroll-like series of Scott Watson’s Nukeletters, written by the poet, writer, editor and publisher, is presented unedited and in its ongoing entirety here at Word Pond. One Nukeletter will be posted each successive day through the completed set of 14 to date. Beyond that, a Nukeletter will be posted as soon as it becomes available. Scott Watson lives in Sendai, Japan. All rights are  © Scott Watson. Word Pond  is deeply grateful for the author’s permission to share this remarkable series.]

Nukeletter 9 of Nukeletters 1 – 14, by Scott Watson, from Sendai, Japan

Nukeletter 9

it is held by some Christians that, during communion, the bread and wine used is, when consecrated, the actual body and blood of Christ. this is called transubstantiation.

some scientists hold that the atomic number of an element can be changed by bombarding it with neutrons or other atomic particles. they call this the transmutation of elements.

wine turns into blood.
bread turns into flesh.

if people in a village are bombarded with radioactive particles they are turned into ghosts when they begin to believe.

[This scroll-like series of Scott Watson’s Nukeletters, written by the poet, writer, editor and publisher, is presented unedited and in its ongoing entirety here at Word Pond. One Nukeletter will be posted each successive day through the completed set of 14 to date. Beyond that, a Nukeletter will be posted as soon as it becomes available. Scott Watson lives in Sendai, Japan. All rights are  © Scott Watson. Word Pond  is deeply grateful for the author’s permission to share this remarkable series.]

Nukeletter 7 of Nukeletters 1 – 14, by Scott Watson, from Sendai, Japan

Nukeletter 7

the number of angels that can appear in a zero.

the number of possible angles in heaven.

butterfly, how many microsieverts an hour?

man is a number

manipulator,

maker of meaning, minder of store.

 

man sees only what is made in his mind.

man says a desert is empty.

what is it that goes on powerlessly empowered as

the tiniest desert being

or being deserted?

 

man says what can’t be measured can’t be real.

no math, no meaning.

 

i don’t know if the unknown is edible

but what’s known is likely a lie,

man’s greatest source of power.

 

“Sie kommt!” a frigid point on a horizon budding badness into a future there may never be,

enlightening now our own intervention.

 

man makes a textbook of skies

lies to memorize for no reason but reason alone.

 

big kaboom out of mind we’ll have this earth gone as if

nothing happened, a blind spot to this home to life

leaving us in permanent negativity.

 

being calm we uncover as desert sand in meditation our

brutish selves we’ve been taught down to.

reduced to a lazy slob without imagination I’m measured as intelligent by

standardized tests

that frighten me with universal law

that is demonstrated by a building in which hydrogen explodes

being the same square shape as one that holds lecture halls in which we

never realize that what is held as real is a chain reaction of lies

set in motion as soon as there is anything we think we know.

 

knowledge mutates man away from revelation.

[This scroll-like series of Scott Watson’s Nukeletters, written by the poet, writer, editor and publisher, is presented unedited and in its ongoing entirety here at Word Pond. One Nukeletter will be posted each successive day through the completed set of 14 to date. Beyond that, a Nukeletter will be posted as soon as it becomes available. Scott Watson lives in Sendai, Japan. All rights are  © Scott Watson. Word Pond  is deeply grateful for the author’s permission to share this remarkable series.]

Nukeletter 4 of Nukeletters 1 – 14, by Scott Watson, from Sendai, Japan

Nukeletter 4

Dear Friends –

recently to my waking dream comes

an image of deceased actor Mifune

Toshiro in a Kurosawa film called Yohjinboh.

Bodyguard. in it, ronin Mifune

confronts a group of crooks. he tries

to extricate himself from that predicament but with

no success. with what may be

described as a combination snort and grunt Mifune

utters BAKA NI TSUKERU KUSURI (wa) NAI

(no cure for a fool) and with

his sword slices off a bad guy’s arm.

why this scene comes to me day by day

I cannot say, other than that it is being

given to me to now to with my pen-sword slice up

these tech-nuke-cracy creeps.

Love and Light,

Scott

[This scroll-like series of Scott Watson’s Nukeletters, written by the poet, writer, editor and publisher, is presented unedited and in its ongoing entirety here at Word Pond. One Nukeletter will be posted each successive day through the completed set of 14 to date. Beyond that, a Nukeletter will be posted as soon as it becomes available. Scott Watson lives in Sendai, Japan. All rights are  © Scott Watson. Word Pond  is deeply grateful for the author’s permission to share this remarkable series.]

Nukeletter 1 of Nukeletters 1 – 14, by Scott Watson, from Sendai, Japan

Not so Newsy Nukeletter [Nukeletter 1]

Dear Friends –

Some things have been bugging me, such as why did Japan go nuke to begin with? Who sells them plutonium? It’s true govindustry [sic] told people nukes are safe and Japan has little in the way of natural resources (as natural resources are interpreted by the powers that be, i.e. nonrenewable), but many do not believe the government. Govindustry used doubtful, manipulative ways to get people to accept nuclear power plants. Elections there were, but elections are a sham, really, when it’s all been worked out beforehand. This is nothing new to anyone, anywhere. Japan has no monopoly on shady dealings.

But it makes me wonder why a supposedly intelligent populace–by which I mean average IQ (if it means anything at all) and literacy rate–might accept such a thing as nukes even if many are from the start wisely wary of their own government.

This is just my mulling on the matter and is not set forth as thoroughly researched findings, or as absolute truth. There are various forces at work besides what I mention here.

Rich Country, Poor Country

Some people might feel a surge of pride when they walk into a room and are introduced as so and so from the United States of America. USA is a big country, a rich country, and a powerful country. If one is from that big rich powerful or old culture country, does it mean we can hold our head high, stick out our chest, or is it like wearing a diamond tiara or riding in a really expensive automobile? Is there an aura around that person’s head?

I tend to inwardly shiver from embarrassment.

Some people like to think of themselves as being from a big city. There are people in Sendai who would very much like to see Sendai grow into a sprawling metropolis such as Tokyo. What a feather in their cap! They can feel confident, even boast, and not feel ashamed about being from a mere provincial city or small country town.

Back when industrialization and militarization gives Japan a chance to behave like the rich and powerful countries of that era, we see Japanese accept imperialism and colonialism. Because for some reason it’s pleasant to think of ourselves as members of a rich and powerful country no matter what other vital concerns national pride might override.

When a Japanese scholar I know was asked why he chose Shakespeare studies as his field, he said it is because Shakespeare is the biggest name in literature.

Then–Oh!–We are a country with nuclear energy! That means we are a developed country. That means we are up there with the rich countries of the world. How wonderful to be from a country bejeweled with nuclear power plants. This sceptered isle!

Will the nukes prove to be a crown of thorns?

Will Japanese crucify themselves to for the sake of an image of national wealth? For pride?

– Scott Watson, July 3, 2011
from Sendai-shi, Miyagi, Japan

[This scroll-like series of Scott Watson’s Nukeletters, written by the poet, writer, editor and publisher, is presented unedited and in its ongoing entirety here at Word Pond. One Nukeletter will be posted each successive day through the completed set of 14 to date. Beyond that, a Nukeletter will be posted as soon as it becomes available. Scott Watson lives in Sendai, Japan. All rights are  © Scott Watson. Word Pond  is deeply grateful for the author’s permission to share this remarkable series.]

Why I Love Homicide: Life on the Street / Telegraph

James Earl Jones and Andre Braugher (l to r)

Why I Love: Homicide: Life on the Street – Telegraph.

“A serialized drama series based on journalist David Simon’s nonfiction book about the Baltimore, Maryland, Police Department’s Homicide Division. Follows the relationships that develop in the unit while the detectives go through their investigations. Tim Bayliss, has been seasoned by investigations into some particularly brutal crimes. Meldrick Lewis is a hard-working detective with a dry sense of humor. Even drier is Detective John Munch, the squad cynic. Guiding the team is Lt. Al Giardello, who continuously struggles with bureaucratic pressure while supporting his detectives and driving them on. Detective Paul Falsone’s intuitive approach to closing murder cases shakes things up; Detective Stuart Gharty is a veteran cop determined to prove himself; and Detective Laura Ballard is a seasoned homicide detective from Seattle.” —  synopsis from the New York Times

Homicide was the first drama to win three prestigious Peabody Awards for best drama (1993, 1995, 1997). It was the predecessor of the better known The Wire, another outstanding series based on the same book, Homicide, A Year on the Killing Streets, by David Simon. In this writer’s opinion, Homicide, outdistances even The Wire. It possesses greatness on many levels: cinematography of Jean De Segonzac; music; the nonfiction book by David Simon; and ensemble cast members — particularly, consistently brilliant performances by Yaphet Kotto, as Lt. Giordello, Clark Johnson as Det. Meldrick Lewis, Richard Belzer as  Det. John Munch, Melissa Leo as Det. Sgt. Kay Howard, Kyle Secor as Det. Tim Bayliss, and Andre Braugher as an unforgettable Det. Frank Pembleton.  – Donna Fleischer