Posts Tagged ‘ soul ’

An Artist’s Guide to Herbs: Blue Vervain – BOMB Magazine

The black music of herbs.

Source: An Artist’s Guide to Herbs: Blue Vervain – BOMB Magazine

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“BODY AND SOUL”: CECILE McLORIN SALVANT SINGS TORCH SONGS at WHITLEY BAY 2013 – YouTube

Tracy Chapman – All that you have is your soul – YouTube

On Alejandra Pizarnik’s poetry – The Volatile I by Johannes Göransson | Boston Review

THE HEART OF WHAT DOES EXIST

do not hand me over,

oh saddest of midnights,

to the impure whiteness of noon.

– Alejandra Pizarnik
from Works and Nights (1965)

LOVERS

a flower

not far from the night

my mute body

opens

to the dew and its fragile urgency

– Alejandra Pizarnik
from Works and Nights (1965)

 

VERTIGO, OR A CONTEMPLATION
OF THINGS THAT COME TO AN END

This lilac unlaces.

It falls from itself

and hides its ancient shadow.

I will die of such things.

– Alejandra Pizarnik
from Extracting the Stone of Madness (1968)

 

DEAF LANTERN

The absent figures are sighing and the night is thick. The night is

the color of the eyelids of the dead.

All night long I make the night. All night long I write. Word by word

I am writing the night.

– Alejandra Pizarnik
from Extracting the Stone of Madness (1968)

Translations by Yvette Siegert

In ecstatic states, it may not be clear whether we are in paradise or hell, whether the song is happy or sad. This is the experience Pizarnik describes even as she propels herself into its drunkenness, creating a saturated atmosphere that is, as Negroni puts it, the “antidote to transcendence.” Or it might be a kind of anti-transcendence, found precisely in the negation of transcendence, the refusal to elevate poetry into “concept.” Her poetry feels like a constant, intensive refusal that generates its own Gothic beauty and black light: “imminence without a recipient. I see the melody.”

Alejandra Pizarnik’s poetry finally gets the English translation it deserves.

Source: The Volatile I | Boston Review

~ to share with Marina

 

 

A Longhouse Birdhouse: KIOSK ~

The Entombment


Our mortal frame,
they call it.
But what did it hold?
The psychologist will say:
Your psyche.
Your soul,
the priest.
Your personality,
the personal manager.

Furthermore,
there’s the anima,
the imago, the daemon,
the identity and the Ego,
not to mention the Id
and the Super-Ego.

The butterfly which is to rise
from this very mixed lot
belongs to a species
about which nothing is known.

———————————
Hans Magnus Enzensberger
Kiosk
translated by Michael Hamburger
Bloodaxe Books 1997

Source: A Longhouse Birdhouse: KIOSK ~

Bruno Bettelheim, “Freud and Man’s Soul” – Rethink.

I could say more about the book, but for those of you who also grapple with the question of the character of political philosophy, you can see how psychoanalysis, or something like it, begins to open a most necessary inquiry. Something about way political philosophy inspired by Leo Strauss is conducted nowadays stays deliberately blind to the educative process. It’s strange how one can detail a number of techniques used by the greatest authors, gain a number of insights, and have nothing to say about who people actually are.

Source: Bruno Bettelheim, “Freud and Man’s Soul” – Rethink.

First Known When Lost: Life As A Work Of Art, Part Four: “Heroes Of The Sub-Plot”

” . . . be we hero or heroine (in our own minds), somebody like Keats brings us back to earth:  “Call the world if you please ‘The vale of Soul-making’. Then you will find out the use of the world.”  The Chinese T’ang Dynasty poets and the Japanese haiku poets possessed this knowledge (via Taoism and Buddhism) several centuries before Keats.  (Which is not to fault Keats: these messages are timeless, but it seems that we have to discover them for ourselves.)

Journeying through the world, —
To and fro, to and fro,
Harrowing the small field.

Basho (translated by R. H. Blyth), in R. H. Blyth, Haiku, Volume 4: Autumn-Winter (Hokuseido 1952).

Source: First Known When Lost: Life As A Work Of Art, Part Four: “Heroes Of The Sub-Plot”

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