Posts Tagged ‘ the body ’

The Wild, Remarkable Sex Scenes of Lidia Yuknavitch – The New Yorker

PHOTOGRAPH BY RENE BURRI/MAGNUM

The Wild, Remarkable Sex Scenes of Lidia Yuknavitch – The New Yorker.

At the conclusion of this article is a remarkable three-minute video with the great writer, Joyce Carol Oates, who likens herself to “a transparent glass of water.”  – word pond

Class Prep [re-loop]: by Bhanu Kapil | Was Jack Kerouac A Punjabi?

2013-06-08 12.22.11 pink lightning in redacted form, Bhanu Kapil

Class Prep [re-loop]: by Bhanu Kapil

Notes on Butoh, Dance of the Abject / Medusa Talks Back

Notes on Butoh, Dance of the Abject | Medusa Talks Back.

Laurie Penny: People power isn’t just a fad for a magazine cover – Commentators – Opinion – The Independent

Laurie Penny: People power isn’t just a fad for a magazine cover – Commentators – Opinion – The Independent.

Somatic poetics / Jacket2

Somatics, like experimental art and poetry, is about finding the right words from the ground up, in relation to embodied conditions. But what if this ground has been contaminated? How does one find ground — a foothold, a purchase? It is as if the whole world need be remade. The body, and language as a body, becomes the beginning of the world again. A ritual of decreation and recreation, of (world) unmaking and remaking. ~ Thom Donovan

Somatic poetics / Jacket2.

Empty poetics / Aaron Asphar: philosophy, critical theory, Western negativity, the body + the poetics of culture

 

 

Empty poetics « Aaron Asphar: philosophy, critical theory, Western negativity, the body + the poetics of culture.

“Text: my body – shot through with streams of song” – Helene Cixous considered through Theodor Adorno’s negative dialectic / Aaron Asphar: poetry, critical theory + philosophy

“Text: my body – shot through with streams of song” – Helene Cixous considered through Theodor Adorno’s negative dialectic « Aaron Asphar: poetry, critical theory + philosophy.

It’s a great loss to announce that Aaron Asphar’s  blog from whence this post derived has gone dark. Knowing Aaron, one glorious day (or night) it may reappear. Meanwhile, rather than delete this post I wish to share a quotation from Aaron Asphar commenting on Hélène Cixous’s The Laugh of the Medusa:

One of the most crucial insights of Freudian psychoanalysis is that the psyche has a social history, not just the Western or social psyche but the monadic modern individual, one in which its language is its history. What Cixous saw was a psychosocial-historical opportunity for a radical self-extrication from Western self-alienation, not just female oppression but Western heteronomy, or dissociative psyche, hence be the catalyst of the transformation for the social order; ‘at present, for historico-cultural reasons, it is women who are opening up . . . those who are locked up know better than their jailers the taste of free air. Thanks to their history, women today know . . . what men will be able to conceive of only much later.’

Rickey Laurentiis / Final Poem for the Body — from Poets for Living Waters

Photograph by Rachel Eliza Griffiths

Final Poem for the Body

(New Orleans, LA)


1. AT RECONCILIATION

There are two tragedies to life, Father.

The first: that we must be born.

We must be born to place with no

obligation to us. This earth

will just as soon fill a lake as it will

a city. If I know this theory of science,

it is because I know nothing else.

I have faith, you could say.

Father, not since that time years ago

have I felt so solid.

Not since that time I suspended

as a single cell have I loved every part of myself.

When mind and body was one. In a circle,

where there is no competition.

When mind didn’t tell body you are

a sickness: you exist to let others know

they are well. Deep inside my mother,

something moved to release me: I let out

the thunder-cry. That is the second tragedy:

we know we must be born. Continue reading