Posts Tagged ‘ tree ’

In Maya Lin’s New Installation, a Forest Grows in Manhattan | Vogue

Maya Lin within Ghost Forest, 2021. Courtesy of the artist and Madison Square Park Conservancy.

Photo: Andy Romer

Forty-nine ghostly cedars have been planted in Madison Square Park, a reminder of the consequences of climate change.

Source: In Maya Lin’s New Installation, a Forest Grows in Manhattan | Vogue

nemfrog – “Cross-section of outer part of secondary bark of…

The Past and the Future of the Earth’s Oldest Trees | The New Yorker

Photograph by John Chiara for The New Yorker

Bristlecone pines have survived various catastrophes over the millennia, and they may survive humanity.

Source: The Past and the Future of the Earth’s Oldest Trees | The New Yorker

Plant a wildlife hedge instead of building a fence | TreeHugger

Here’s what to plant to keep wildlife happy and the neighbors out of sight.

Source: Plant a wildlife hedge instead of building a fence | TreeHugger

Today’s Haiku (February 7, 2019) | Blue Willow Haiku World (by Fay Aoyagi)

つひに吾れも枯野のとほき樹となるか  野見山朱鳥

tsuini ware mo kareno no tôki ki to naru ka

finally, I also become

a faraway tree

in the withered field

Asuka Nomiyama

Fay Aoyagi, translation

from “Haiku-kai” (“Haiku World,” a monthly haiku magazine), July 2017 Issue, Bungaku No Mori, Tokyo

Source: Today’s Haiku (February 7, 2019) | Blue Willow Haiku World (by Fay Aoyagi)

Persimmons – Part 1 | Icebox

Persimmons – part 1

I have a persimmon tree in front of my room. It has produced a rich harvest this year. In fact, like many other fruit trees, it bears a lot of fruit every other year. However, the persimmons this tree produces are very small, less than the size of ping-pong balls. I believe this tree was here long before the garden was made, and that it belongs to the species called Yamagaki (Mountain Persimmon). Its fruits are probably very sour and nobody cares for them, but as autumn deepens, their colour also deepens, till birds come and peck at them. This is the tree’s only use, but when I see it growing in the shadow of a big cherry, doing its best to survive, I cannot help cheering it on.
………………  Time for persimmons
………………  To mature and redden —
………………  The sky is so blue.
I have been close to persimmons since my childhood. We had a persimmon tree in our garden when I was at primary school. My father fastened sturdy ropes around one of its branches and made a swing for me. I was very proud of it and happily swung back and forth on it, but one day the branch broke off without warning and threw both the swing and me to the ground. Fortunately, I landed on a soft lawn, so I escaped with only scratches to my knees. This experience taught me, though, that persimmon trees were easily broken, and since then I have made it a rule not to climb them.

During our wartime evacuation, I enjoyed sweet persimmons. The earliest kind we had was called Bongineri (Bon-Festival Sweet Persimmon). Its fruits were small and had lots of seeds, but their flesh, strewn with black flecks resembling sesame seeds, was delicious. Later in autumn I would enjoy large persimmons that had been sweetened in rice chests — so big and sweet that I found them satisfying in every sense. Occasionally I enjoyed the special variety called Saijogaki (Saijo Persimmons), which I thought to be a real treasure.
………………  The sweet persimmons
………………  With dots like sesame seeds —
………………  Everyone eats laughing.

………………  Sweetened persimmons
………………  Melt on our tongues, so slow to
………………  Reach our stomachs.

Odilon Redon (1840-1916 French) • Le Jour (from the Dream series) 1891 | inni in vani

Source: Odilon Redon (1840-1916 French) • Le Jour (from the Dream series) 1891 | inni in vani

sometimes we resist by stephen collis |cascadia review

sometimes we resist

by stephen collis

 


I was      in a park

I could not see
Global capitalism

Its     dinosaur bones
Covered in chrome 

I saw      trees
Their leaves
Turning yellow and
Golden brown

I saw the harbour
And the city set
Down below 
The mountain

A place you’d descend to
Or ascend from

I asked someone
How do we resist?

Consider the trees
Bending in the wind
Their root grip
Deep in the land

Consider the mountain
That does not drift
A little east or west
North or south

But remains a marker
We chart day’s circuits round

I asked
What if they come
With saw teeth
For the trees

With horizontal 
Directional drilling
For pipelines through
Mountain’s immobile heart?

And one there said
Sometimes the voice
Sometimes the voices
Tear teeth from saw’s blades

Sometimes a body
Sometimes all our bodies
Blunt the bits of drills
Dull dollar’s desire

Sometimes 
Someone said
Someone just like
You or me

Sometimes we resist

Sometimes we win

 

 

sometimes we resist.

Somatic Poetry Rituals: Cartography Workshop with CAConrad — Flying Object

Somatic Poetry Rituals: Cartography Workshop with CAConrad — Flying Object.

The PIP (Project for Innovative Poetry) Blog: Ingeborg Bachmann

 

 

The PIP (Project for Innovative Poetry) Blog: Ingeborg Bachmann.