Posts Tagged ‘ women ’

Who’s Afraid of Claire Messud? – The New York Times

Recently she went to a party where all the women were skinny and all the men were overweight. ‘‘For the men, it’s perfectly acceptable to be a person of appetites,’’ she said. ‘‘You’re in midlife, you’re at the peak of your professional moment.’’ Again, she slipped into character. ‘‘ ‘Pour me a glass of wine and give me a steak!’ ’’ The women, by contrast, were nibbling crackers and drinking seltzer. ‘‘There should be no shame in appetite,’’ she said, her voice rising. ‘‘There should be no shame in anger. There should be no shame in love. There should be no shame in wanting things.’’ – Claire Messud

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Against the Couple-Form | LIES Journal

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“In this pathetic, stillborn world, we do have feelings. Sometimes we look at someone and think we are in love with them. We must crush the illusion that romance is or will be an avenue for liberation. We must divest from romantic relationships as means through which we might access a better world than this one. In realizing that their economies and conventions are part and parcel of the continuing soft disaster of our lives, we will leave behind all hitherto existing couples. New and perhaps unknown forms of feminist organizing present the only possible frontier for love.

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Make love. Anything can be sex. The body is rich and varied in its parts and sensations. So many ecstasies have yet to be felt. Get away from the genital organisation of ‘sexuality.’

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Construct autonomous feminist spaces where women produce their own action and discourse. Banish the mediation by men of relationships between women. Prevent a single relationship from alienating oneself from the processes that contribute to liberation and the abolition of capitalism and patriarchy. Let no single bond stand in the way of friendship, organizing, and advancing the interests of the class.

CLÉMENCE X. CLEMENTINE AND ASSOCIATES FROM THE INFINITE VENOM GIRL GANG
Against the Couple-Form

 

Source: Against the Couple-Form | LIES Journal

Samuel R Delany – Radicalism Begins in the Body | Boston Review

“I don’t know if you saw a credo of mine I restated recently on Facebook; I throw it in here: The violation of reproductive rights is not the only problem women have. First, not all women reproduce. Second, not all women reproduce their entire lives long. Third, the discrimination that women face starts when they are born and continues through till they are dead—and, in terms of historical presentation of their achievements and struggles or just their ordinary lives, often beyond. Fourth, the patterns of prejudice and discrimination against women are the model, adjusted, for all other forms: racial, religious, and all the others. The infantilizing, the devaluation of experience, the stigmatizing, the economic punishment is all learned with women and applied to the others. Although the group I tend to concentrate on and have for the last thirty-five-odd years is gay men, because it is the one I belong to, I have been aware since my teens that prejudice against women is the main source of our political dilemma. Fix that, in terms of transgender women, gay women, black women, Asian women, poor women, and cisgender white women, and you go a long way toward fixing the whole machine. And fixing any male group’s problem (or individual’s) has to be done with an awareness of the whole.” – Samuel R. Delany

Source: Radicalism Begins in the Body | Boston Review

Where We Go From Here: On “Political” Poetry and Marginalization, by Cynthia Cruz | VIDA: Women in Literary Arts

 

“But one voice is not enough, nor two, although this is where dialogue begins.” — Cherrie Moraga THE PROBLEMSomething occurred during the days after the Trump election. There was a marked difference between those who were angry and … [Read More]

Source: Where We Go From Here: On “Political” Poetry and Marginalization | VIDA: Women in Literary Arts

10 Female Jazz Musicians You Need To Know

Mary Osborne, Vi Redd, Dottie Dodgion, Marian McPartland & Lynn Milano | © Tom Marcello/Flickr

We take a look at some of the jazz genre’s most pioneering female musicians from the past 100 years.

Source: 10 Female Jazz Musicians You Need To Know

‘Literature is against us’: In Conversation with Anne Boyer : Amy King : Harriet the Blog : The Poetry Foundation

Portrait with Mel Chin’s “revised post soviet tools to be used against the unslakable thirst of 21st century capitalism”

If you don’t know Anne Boyer’s work, you should. She’s a fierce intellect, tremendous poet, and laudable person. I’m grateful she spent time untangling my meandering questions. Her new book, Garments Against Women, is just out from Ahsahta Press, a perfect fit for Boyer’s words. We talk politics, protest, the personal and poetry. Boyer’s strength and […]

Source: ‘Literature is against us’: In Conversation with Anne Boyer : Amy King : Harriet the Blog : The Poetry Foundation

“Beyond God the Father”,an Interview with Mary Daly :: DALHOUSIE REVIEW

. . . Following in the paths of these many fore-sisters, including fore- sisters who were burned as witches, Virginia Woolfand fore-sisters present and future, I would like to move towards conclusion thinking about the breaking out of women as a summoning of our deep memories. Women are like volcanoes. Explosions of our ancestral racial deep memory are necessary to break the unnatural crusts of the Fore- ground. Such explosions coming from deep internal potency can be compared to the explosions of a volcano. A volcano is a vent in the earth’s crust from which molten or hot rock and steam issue. Volcanic eruptions in women’s deep Re-memberings are Elemental, breaking through the vents in the crust, and although these may be experienced as sudden, the forces that caused them have been brewing in deep natural cauldrons. Women ourselves are the brewsters as well as the cauldrons; we are the agents of our own elemental explosions. The rhythms of our Re-membering are not like the tedious, tidy, tick-tocks ofthe clocks and watches oftidy time: Father Time, which is very tidy, 9 to 5. Think also, of the doomsday clock. The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientist put out in the United States has in every issue, a sketch of what they call the doomsday clock. Midnight represents, of course, nuclear holocaust. In January 1984, they set the hands at three minutes to midnight. So much for the clocks and watches of Father Time. The rhythms of our Re-membering are tidal. We may find insights about these rhythms in the words of the scientist Rachel Carson, concerning a small, green worm known to marine biologists as Convoluta roscof- fensis who lives in the sea sand, rising when the tide has ebbed and sinking into the sand when the tide returns. Sometimes scientists transfer a whole colony of these worms into an aquarium where there are no tides. Rachel Carson writes:

“But twice each day Convoluta rises out ofthe sand on the bottom ofthe aquarium, into the light of the sun. And twice each day she sinks again into the sand. Without a brain or what we would call a memory or even any very clear perception, Convoluta continues to live out her life in this alien place, remembering in every fibre of her small, green body the tidal rhythm of the distant sea.”J

So, too even within these most alien places women can remember our original rhythms, and these rhythms are lunar, natural rhythms: Rhythms of spirit j matter, rhythms of imagining, of thinking, of psy- chic force.

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. . . Women are batteries. If you refuse to be a battery, then the male has to find the source of energy in himself. The patriarchial male then is thrown back upon his own possibility for generating his own energy, without sapping, vampirizing, women. And that, indeed, would be a great opportunity, it seems to me-to be able to not be a parasite, to not be a vampire. But, the trick is, if you do this primarily for men, again, you are missing the point, because women under patriarchy have never been for ourselves. Yes, most women bond with men in some way, but I’m inviting you to consider something ehe: the gynergizing, ecstatic experience of woman- bonding. Then you may want to reconsider that question or ask it again but it Will be in a different context, in a different environment.

 

— Mary Daly  (pp279;685-686 DALHOUSIE REVIEW )