Posts Tagged ‘ Wordsworth ’

Zeitgeist Spam: From John Gossage, The Pond / Allen Ginsberg, “Conversation with My Dying Father” (for “father” substitute “country” or “currently existing ecosystems” if desired)

CONVERSATION WITH MY DYING FATHER
Wasted arms, feeble knees,
eighty years old, hair thin and white,
cheek bonier than I’d remembered,
head bowed on his neck,
eyes open now and then he listened,
I read my father Wordsworth’s
Intimations of Immortality Ode.
‘Trailing clouds of glory do we come
from God who is our home.’
‘That’s beautiful,’ he said, ‘but it is not true.

When I was a boy,’ he continued, ‘we had
a house on Boyd Street Newark New Jersey.
The backyard was a big empty lot full of bushes
and whole grass. I always wondered
what was behind those trees.
When I grew older, I walked around the block
and found out what was back there, it was
a glue factory.’

Source: Zeitgeist Spam: From John Gossage, The Pond / Allen Ginsberg, “Conversation with My Dying Father” (for “father” substitute “country” or “currently existing ecosystems” if desired)

The Sparrow’s Nest read by Paul Conneally | Burn The Water

British poet Paul Conneally (aka Little Onion) reads The Sparrow’s Nest by William Wordsworth in Burleigh Wood (The Bluebell Woods) on the outskirts of Loughborough in the heart of England. . . .

Source: The Sparrow’s Nest read by Paul Conneally | Burn The Water

Hedge Sparrows | Burn The Water

My work has often seen me walk and write symbiotically with William Wordsworth. I’m suddenly jolted back into that relationship with the realisation that all the roads around here, an housing estate in Dronfield Woodhouse, are named after places in The Lake District and that everyday I walk this road, Grasmere Road. Grasmere the birth and burial place of the great poet.

Here are some lines he wrote by Grasmere Lake in 1806:

CLOUDS, lingering yet, extend in solid bars
Through the grey west; and lo! these waters, steeled
By breezeless air to smoothest polish, yield
A vivid repetition of the stars;
Jove, Venus, and the ruddy crest of Mars
Amid his fellows beauteously revealed
At happy distance from earth’s groaning field,
Where ruthless mortals wage incessant wars.
Is it a mirror?–or the nether Sphere
Opening to view the abyss in which she feeds
Her own calm fires?–But list! a voice is near;
Great Pan himself low-whispering through the reeds, ‘Be thankful, thou; for, if unholy deeds
Ravage the world, tranquillity is here!’

William Wordsworth
Grasmere Lake
1806

And I walk on. Four times a day. I travel the edges. The between ways. Sometimes crossing the borders other times sticking close by them but remaining to one side. Trying to make sense of, to know this place and that and mine too.

a car alarm
suddenly stops
hedge sparrows

Paul Conneally
Dronfield Woodhouse
December 31st 2019

Source: Hedge Sparrows | Burn The Water

“Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star” as an Ambient Poem; a Study of a Dialectical Image; with Some Remarks on Coleridge and Wordsworth – by Timothy Morton | Romantic Circles

“The Star”

Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
How I wonder what you are!
Up above the world so high,
Like a diamond in the sky.

When the blazing sun is gone,
When he nothing shines upon,
Then you show your little light,
Twinkle, twinkle, all the night.

Then the traveller in the dark,
Thanks you for your tiny spark:
He could not see which way to go,
If you did not twinkle so.

In the dark blue sky you keep,
And often through my curtains peep,
For you never shut your eye,
Till the sun is in the sky.

As your bright and tiny spark
Lights the traveller in the dark,
Though I know not what you are,
Twinkle, twinkle, little star.

– Jane Taylor

This essay is a testing ground for “ambience,” exploring the role of space in poetics, ideology and theory, building on the conclusion to the book The Poetics of Spice. Though ecocriticism and ecological philosophy talk about environmental awareness and “interconnectedness,” we may not be certain of what we mean by such terms. They should, for example, remind all literary scholars of the idea, and the ideology, of the aesthetic. By closely reading the famous poem “The Star” by Jane Taylor, this essay delineates some of the poetic forms involved in the inscription of environmental awareness, such as minimalism, and the foregrounding of what in structuralism is called the “contact” or medium of communication. The essay investigates the possibility of a “feminine” form of Romantic ecology in contradistinction to more masculinist versions. It uses Jacques Lacan and Jacques Derrida to counter the representation of ecological awareness in Martin Heidegger and Jean-Paul Sartre. The essay discusses the work on culture and civilization by Geoffrey Hartman and Terry Eagleton to adumbrate the ways in which public space is evoked in environmental poetics. Walter Benjamin’s notion of the “dialectical image” is employed to indicate the Janus-faced nature of the poetic and ideological fantasy of “ambience” (or “aura” in Benjamin). In considering William Wordsworth’s sonnet “Composed upon Westminster Bridge” and Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, the essay investigates the virtues and vices of ambience, as opposed to a more Burkean, “maximalist” view of the natural world. The essay continues the line of thought explored in David Simpson’s Wordsworth and the Figurings of the Real, especially the final section, “Societies of Figures.”

Source: “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star” as an Ambient Poem; a Study of a Dialectical Image; with Some Remarks on Coleridge and Wordsworth | Romantic Circles

Obey the Process of Fancy – Paul Conneally

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(– for various reasons, I prefer ‘Imagine the process of fancy’. – df )

Poems and Poetics: Julie Carr and Jeffrey C. Robinson: From “An Introduction to Active Romanticism”

 


Cover drawing (“Ruckenfigur”) for Active Romanticism by Susan Bee

Poems and Poetics: Julie Carr and Jeffrey C. Robinson: From “An Introduction to Active Romanticism”.

Interview: Dan Beachy-Quick on Keats, the Agonal, and the Sublime | The Arcadia Project

Interview: Dan Beachy-Quick on Keats, the Agonal, and the Sublime | The Arcadia Project.

The Old Ways: A Journey on Foot by Robert Macfarlane: review – Telegraph

The Old Ways: A Journey on Foot by Robert Macfarlane: review – Telegraph.

Joanna Rocks by Paul Conneally

Joanna Rocks

no time for streams
or those that look at hills
you learn to love
passing your early youth
amid the smoke of cities

lofty firs
taller than the old steeple
village news

the vicar’s collar
a house big enough
for ten rough sleepers

autumn shadows
spray-painted on a boulder
by the rail-track
in huge red lettering
Joanna Rocks

Paul Conneally
from  Invigilator (2010)

Snibston Wordsworth Trail – Solar Powered Poem / INVIGILATOR

 

 

Snibston Wordsworth Trail – Solar Powered Poem – INVIGILATOR.