goldfinch flash by Donna Fleischer | bottle rockets #6

Originally posted on word pond:

goldfinch flash
in cloudless blue remains
of a thunderstorm . . .
seed heads float by
at eye level

~ Donna Fleischer
in
bottle rockets Spring 2002, #6

View original

Ten questions for Thomas Piketty, the economist who exposed capitalism’s fatal flaw – Quartz

 

Author Thomas Piketty   Reuters/Benoit Tessier

Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century went on sale in the U.S. this week, and its central message can seem like a prophecy of doom. It is that capital tends to accumulate faster than the economy grows in the long run; wealth thus concentrates in the hands of a few; and the egalitarian, upwardly mobile America of the mid-20th century was more a historical aberration than the natural order of things. Through their research into income inequality, Piketty and his colleague Emmanuel Saez provided the “1% vs the 99%” narrative that drove the Occupy Movement.

But what’s often missed, as Quartz’s Tim Fernholz found out when he talked to Piketty, is that the 42-year-old French economist is actually rather optimistic. To those who say that a global wealth tax, his proposed solution to inequality, is something that Americans would never accept, he retorts that nobody in 1910 thought the US would ever have income taxes, or more recently, that Swiss bank secrecy could ever be broken. A wealth tax, he suggests, could replace a tax on property, making it popular with middle-class homeowners and giving politicians a lever to push it through.

But whether Piketty’s optimism is misplaced, or even whether he is right, matters less than the fact that, by framing the problem in these clear terms, he has enabled a public debate. “Piketty has transformed our economic discourse; we’ll never talk about wealth and inequality the same way we used to,” wrote Paul Krugman, who knows a thing or two himself about changing economic discourse. Another legendary economist, Paul Samuelson, once said, “I don’t care who writes a nation’s laws, or crafts its treatises, if I can write its economics textbooks.” If Piketty’s work influences the terms in which politicians fight their battles, he too may end up having more influence than many of them.—Gideon Lichfield

Ten questions for Thomas Piketty, the economist who exposed capitalism’s fatal flaw – Quartz.

Punctum, the Senior BFA Photography Exhibition Opens at the Silpe Gallery, April 17, 2014 at the University of Hartford, West Hartford, CT

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The Senior BFA photographers are

Terrel Grant • Hannah Klotz • Kimberly  Macdonald • Erin McPeek • Cassandra Mendoza • Katie Miles • Hannah Minor • Sydney Morris • Johanna Pirog • Erin Shaw • Natalie Titone • Christian Welsh

The use of  punctum is based on its definition in the book Camera Lucida by Roland Barthes.

Punctum, the Senior BFA Photography Exhibition Opens at the Silpe Gallery

HARTFORD LOVES POETRY GRAND FINALE — A COMMUNITY CELEBRATION, Saturday April 9, 2014, 1- 4 pm, HARTFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY, Downtown Hartford, CT

Hartford Loves Poetry Logo

HARTFORD LOVES POETRY GRAND FINALE

A COMMUNITY CELEBRATION

Saturday April 9, 1-4

HARTFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY

DOWNTOWN

500 Main Street, (860) 695-6300

FESTIVAL COMMUNITY READERS

Adelia Santa Cruz (Quechua)

Ahalya Desikan (Tamil)

Alisa Dzananovic (Bosnian)

An-MingTruxes (Chinese)

Anetsiv Delgado (Spanish)

Bettina Viereck (German)

Donna Fleischer (English)

Esther McCune (Portuguese)

Francesco Martini (Italian)

Georgia Stathoulas (Greek)

Ildie David (Hungarian)

Isabel Calione (Spanish)

Jesse Marie Kavumpurath (Malayalam)

Lachu Acharya (Nepali)

Maha Darawsha (Arabic)

Maria Cristina Cuerda (Spanish)

Nilofer Haider (Urdu)

Nina Sakun (Ukrainian)

Noeet Bachar (Hebrew)

Rachna Ramya Agrawal (Hindi)

Regina G. Chatel (Polish)

Srinivas Mandavalli (Hindi)

Vjange Hazle (Jamaican Dialect/Patois)

Guest appearance by poet Joyce Ashuntantang

from Cameroon reciting in Kenyang.

 

SPECIAL THANKS  for invaluable help in reaching out to immigrant communities in Connecticut, with  heartfelt thanks to Dr. William A. Howe, Chair, CT Asian Pacific American Affairs Commission; Lynne Williamson, Director, CT Cultural Heritage Arts Program, Institute of Community Research; Dr. Shyamala Raman, Director of International Studies, University of St. Joseph; and Patricia Parlette, Administrative Coordinator, Dept. of Modern and Classical Languages, UCONN. Thanks to M. Susan Holmes, Arts Management Consultant; Rainwater Design; HPL Branch Managers and staff; Marketing Events and Cultural Affairs, City of Hartford. Special gratitude goes to all the community participants, who have donated their time and whose generosity and willingness to share poems from their countries has made today’s program.

Bessy Reyna, Festival Curator

http://www.hplct.org

 

Submitted Photo from www.bessyreyna.com/ Bessy Reyna

Submitted Photo from http://www.bessyreyna.com/ Bessy Reyna

Andy Thibault: Immersion and enrichment opportunity for speakers of English

 

Three Poems by Paul Celan from Snowpart | Jacket2

 

Paul Celan

Three Poems by Paul Celan from Snowpart | Jacket2.

O Little Root of a Dream by Paul Celan | Poets.org

O Little Root of a Dream

  by Paul Celan
translated by Heather McHugh and Nikolai Popov

O little root of a dream 
you hold me here 
undermined by blood, 
no longer visible to anyone, 
property of death.

Curve a face
that there may be speech, of earth, 
of ardor, of
things with eyes, even
here, where you read me blind,

even 
here, 
where you 
refute me, 
to the letter.

 

O Little Root of a Dream by Paul Celan

M X T by Sina Queyras | The Rumpus.net

M X T By Sina Queyras – The Rumpus.net.

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